'Star Trek' star George Takei says he's 'shocked and bewildered' by sexual assault claim

PHOTO: George Takei attends the press conference for The Japanese American National Museums exhibition "Instructions To All Persons: Reflections On Executive Order 9066" at Japanese American National Museum, Feb. 17, 2017 in Los Angeles.Gabriel Olsen/Getty Images, FILE
George Takei attends the press conference for The Japanese American National Museum's exhibition "Instructions To All Persons: Reflections On Executive Order 9066" at Japanese American National Museum, Feb. 17, 2017 in Los Angeles.

"Star Trek" actor George Takei is denying allegations that he sexually assaulted a former model and actor in his Los Angeles home back in the 1980s.

Scott R. Brunton told The Hollywood Reporter that when he was 23, he met Takei, who was in his 40s at the time, at a local bar.

One night in 1981, Brunton claimed, after the two men went out, Takei invited Brunton back to his Los Angeles condo for a nightcap.

"We have the drink, and he asks if I would like another," Brunton said in the magazine. "And I said sure. So, I have the second one, and then all of a sudden, I begin feeling very disoriented and dizzy, and I thought I was going to pass out."

PHOTO: Presenter George Takei speaks onstage at AARPs 16th Annual Movies For Grownups Awards at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel, Feb. 6, 2017 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Earl Gibson III/Getty Images, FILE
Presenter George Takei speaks onstage at AARP's 16th Annual Movies For Grownups Awards at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel, Feb. 6, 2017 in Beverly Hills, Calif.

"I said I need to sit down, and he said, 'Sit over here,' and he had the giant, yellow beanbag chair," Brunton said. "So I sat down in that and leaned my head back and I must have passed out."

Brunton then claims the actor groped him inappropriately.

"I came to and said, 'What are you doing?!' I said, 'I don't want to do this.' He goes, 'You need to relax. I am just trying to make you comfortable. Get comfortable.' And I said, 'No. I don't want to do this.' And I pushed him off, and he said, 'OK, fine,'" the former model and actor said. "And I said, 'I am going to go, and he said, 'If you feel you must. You're in no condition to drive.' I said, 'I don't care I want to go.'"

PHOTO: George Takei attends the opening night of King Of The Yees at the Kirk Douglas Theater, July 16, 2017 in Culver City, Calif.Greg Doherty/Getty Images, FILE
George Takei attends the opening night of "King Of The Yees" at the Kirk Douglas Theater, July 16, 2017 in Culver City, Calif.

ABC News reached out to Brunton, but didn't immediately hear back. ABC News also reached out to reps for Takei, but didn't immediately hear back.

Takei, now 80, who is best known for his role as Hikaru Sulu on the original "Star Trek" television series, took to Twitter to deny the allegations.

"I want to assure you all that I am as shocked and bewildered at these claims as you must feel reading them," he wrote Saturday morning. "The events he describes back in the 1980s simply did not occur, and I do not know why he has claimed them now. I have wracked my brain to ask if I remember Mr. Brunton, and I cannot say I do."

Takei said he's taking Brunton's claims "seriously," which is why he wanted to respond.

"Right now it is a he said / he said situation, over alleged events nearly 40 years ago," Takei wrote. "But those that know me understand that non-consensual acts are so antithetical to my values and my practices, the very idea that someone would accuse me of this is quite personally painful."

The actor also wrote on Twitter that his husband, Brad, is "100 percent beside me on this, as my life partner of more than 30 years and now my husband, stands fully by my side. I cannot tell you how vital it has been to have his unwavering support and love in these difficult times."

Takei ended his series of tweets by addressing his fans.

"Thanks to many of you for all the kind words and trust. It means so much to us," he said.

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