Steven Avery from 'Making a Murderer' Gets New Representation

PHOTO: Steven Avery, right, is escorted and being charged with killing Teresa Halbach, into a Manitowoc County Courtroom for his preliminary hearing, Dec. 6, 2005, in Manitowoc, Wis. PlayMorry Gash/AP
WATCH Petition Sent to White House With 130,000 Signatures Supporting Exoneration of Steven Avery

A high-profile attorney is now representing Steven Avery, the subject of a popular Netflix series "Making a Murderer."

Kathleen Zellner of The Law Firm of Kathleen Zellner and Associates, P.C. in Downers Grove, Illinois, announced in a press release Friday that the firm "will be assuming the full and complete representation of Steven Avery in all criminal matters."

Avery is the latest addition to Zellner's client list, which has included Ryan Ferguson, who was exonerated and later released from prison after being wrongfully convicted of murder. She was also an attorney to Mario Casciaro, who was released last September after successfully appealing his 26-year prison sentence for the murder of missing teen Brian Carrick.

The release also said that Zellner will be assisted by Tricia Bushnell, described as "local Wisconsin counsel."

The announcement concluded with, "The Zellner Law Firm is looking forward to adding Mr. Avery to its long list of wrongful conviction exonerations."

"Making a Murderer" follows the life of Avery, a Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, native who spent 18 years behind bars for a sexual assault he didn't commit. He was exonerated by DNA evidence in 2003, and later filed a $36 million lawsuit against the county, its former sheriff, Thomas Kocourek, and former district attorney, Denis Vogel. The case was settled for $400,000 in 2006, according to the Associated Press.

Avery was charged in 2005 with killing photographer Teresa Halbach. He pleaded not guilty. Avery and his nephew Brendan Dassey were convicted of the crime in 2007, and Avery was sent back to prison to serve a life sentence without the possibility of parole. Avery appealed, but the verdict was upheld in 2011, according to reports.