Day 43 of Gulf Oil Spill: Countdown to Pipe Cutting, New Dome

Two Relief Wells Being Drilled

As BP attempts the latest fix the Obama administration has ordered the company to drill two relief wells but those are not expected to be ready for months.

BP will have to drill two miles beneath the surface of the earth and hit a target approximately the size of a dinner plate.

"They are looking at some technologies, some camera technology that they will use to locate the pipe underground, but obviously we wanted to make sure there were redundancies because we need to get this thing stopped," Browner said. "We've always understood that the relief well was the way to permanently stop it."

First Day of Hurricane Season

June 1 marks the first day of hurricane season and it is expected to be the most intense since 2005, the year Katrina hit Louisiana.

VIDEO: Dem. strategist James Carville says the president needs to keep public informed.
James Carville Rates Obama's Gulf Response

Forecasters are predicting up to 23 named storms, with as many as seven major hurricanes, some of which could inevitably head for the already battered Gulf Coast. In past hurricane seasons three of the worst storms ever to make landfall in the Gulf -- Betsy in 1965, Camille in 1969 and Katrina in 2005—took paths that directly crossed through the leak site.

First Day of Hurricane Season

The man-made sand bars and miles of boom will likely be rendered useless in the event of a hurricane.

"You take anywhere from a 10- to 20-foot storm surge, catch any of that oil…[and] once it gets behind the estuary system that is the basis of life, this could be devastating beyond anything you could ever imagine," Kevin Diaz, a local fisherman, said.

VIDEO: BPs latest tactic involves slicing off the broken pipeline and capping it.
Risky 7th Attempt to Stop Gulf Leak

Browner said the administration has a "very grave concern" about hurricanes in the Gulf this summer.

"I think our greatest concern about hurricanes is that if we are capturing the oil and putting it up to a vessel on the surface that vessel will have to leave the area during a hurricane which means the flow will be unabated," Browner said.

Forecasters say that while a storm passing to the west of the oil slick could push oil towards the Mississippi Delta, a hurricane passing to the east of the slick could drive the oil toward the Flordia panhandle.

Some experts even say that a hurricane could help break down the oil.

"When you add a dispersant to the water and there's turbulence it basically churns up the water and gets the oil to break into droplets…a hurricane with very very strong wind and waves does that same thing naturally," Nancy Kinner, professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of New Hampshire said.

Click here to return to the "Good Morning America" Web site.

-- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 10793342. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 10793342. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 10793342. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 10793342. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 10793342. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 10793342. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 10793342.
Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...