Best Jobs for Retirees

4. Retail Sales: Bookstores, Drugstores and Specialty Chains
Retailers like seniors because they're typically more patient with customers and provide a higher quality of service. They're also more likely to stay, which lessens the cost of high turnover. Stores like Borders, CVS, Crate & Barrel and Target like to hire people who know their merchandise, so apply to places you like to shop.

5. Medical Transcription
Just yesterday I spoke with an executive at MedQuist, one of the largest medical transcription companies in the country, and they say there's a shortage of talent in this industry. So if you're looking for something you can count on for the next five, 10, even 20 years, this is a smart field to consider. You have to invest in training, which can take six to nine months, but there's ample opportunity if you are skilled in this arena.

For more resources on working from home -- and advice on how to find legitimate opportunities visit WomenForHire.com.

6. Teaching Aides
Contact the local public school districts and private schools in your area now to ask about their staffing needs for the upcoming school year. Many hiring decisions will be made in the month ahead.

7. Small Businesses
More than 97 percent of companies have less than 100 employees, and they serve as the backbone of our economy. Don't neglect local businesses in your search. Most of them don't advertise their openings; they rely on word of mouth to fill their needs.

Tips to Remember When Job Hunting


Seek services catering to mature workers. There are now Web sites and a range of local and national programs supported by direct employers and nonprofit organizations that can connect mature workers with qualified leads and opportunities. Click here for a list of those and other valuable resources for seniors.

Avoiding scams with online opportunities. For many seniors, there's a legitimate concern about wasting money or getting sucked into online scams. There are two things to keep in mind, which will help you weed out many seemingly good opportunities:

* Exaggerated promises are the first warning sign. "Make $1,500 a week with no skills or experience!" "Join us for unlimited earning potential with as little as an hour day." Statements like that should be a red flag because every legitimate opportunity takes work and effort.

* No phone number to speak with someone. If someone is providing you with an opportunity to make money, you should be able to ask questions and talk to a live person by phone. Many new savvy online scammers have set up automated online chat boxes that pop-up to make you think you're "talking" to a live person, but no such person exists. Make sure you can talk directly with someone who'll answer your specific concerns, not merely refer you to a basic Web page.

For more resources on working from home -- and advice on how to find legitimate opportunities visit WomenForHire.com.

Tory Johnson is the Workplace Contributor on Good Morning America and the CEO of Women For Hire.

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