Transcript: Diane Sawyer Interviews Queen Rania

I was completely inspired by them. And I feel that, you know, if we can provide this kind of chance to people everywhere, then imagine the kind of changes we'll see in our world. You know, often times, we think of girls as soft and vulnerable. And we don't really think of them as possibly being the solutions to some of the world's toughest problems, but they really are. You know? You educate a girl. She gains self confidence and self-respect. She gets married later in life. She has fewer kids. She earns a higher income and spends that income on her -- her family's education and health.

You know, she contributes to her society. She's more protected from HIV, from abuse, from exploitation. So, the benefits are numerous. And, you know, I feel that this is an investment that -- that is really worth making. And should be top priority for most leaders. I feel that the education of girls really transforms societies.

SAWYER:

Yes, you wrote once -- that "Education has been my shield, my sword, and my olive branch." Did you write that on Twitter?

QUEEN RANIA:

Yeah. (LAUGH) Just something I -- it's just a thought that came to my mind.

Queen Rania on Royal Tweeting

SAWYER:

I believe you are the first member of a royal family to be on Twitter.

QUEEN RANIA:

I think I -- you know, I think I might be. And I find that kind of strange, because, you know, Twitter is -- is a venue that would suit somebody in -- in my position.

SAWYER:

Because?

QUEEN RANIA:

Well, because I think with us -- it's difficult to make friends sometimes. And -- and people are reluctant to speak their mind, because sometimes they feel they have to be formal. Or sometimes they feel like they don't want to be the bearers of bad news. And Twitter is -- and other social media, not just Twitter, is a great venue where you can really connect with people. Very raw and natural and unedited. And that's really useful. Because sometimes you just want to get to the truth.

And it really gives you insights into people's minds. How they're thinking, what they're feeling, what the trends out there are. So, in -- in a sense, it's a way for me to give people a window into my life. And for me to also -- it's a great way for me to look into their lives and learn a lot. So, that's been fantastic. And, you know -- as I've said, with -- with education, I just think of, you know, "Where would I be without my education? And would I be able to do what I'm doing today?"

And sometimes I also look at -- at myself and -- and I'm sure all your viewers, as well, we agonize over our kids' education. We sit there and think is -- did we send them to the right school? Did we make the right decisions for them? Because we understand how important their education is for their future. How critical it is in the final outcome of their lives. And we just need to realize that every parent feels that way towards their children. Every parent wants to give their children the chance at a better life. And often times, it's -- education's a lifeline. It provides children with the opportunity to put their -- their foot on the first rung of a ladder that can really see them climbing out of poverty. And breaking the chains and cycles of -- of disadvantage, that have gone through generations. So.

SAWYER:

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