GMA: Ex-Mobster Says Mob Culture Sells

He never killed anybody, but he was present at some murders, Hill said. Although he regrets doing "a lot of terrible things", he is trying to make amends now by working as a drug and alcohol counselor for young people.

If he had stayed in the mob, he might not have lived very long.

"The life expectancy for a mobster isn't forever, so you live every day to the fullest," Hill says. "Your best friend could kill you.... And you accept that eventually you'll do time in prison."

The turning point that made him decide to leave the mob was the Lufthansa robbery, for which he received only about $50,000 or $60,000. He was the only connection to the heist's masterminds, Vario and Burke, and the mob said they would kill him if he squealed. Yet, the federal government was offering to keep him alive.

After he turned informant, mobsters placed a million-dollar price on his head.

Federal marshals whisked him into the Witness Relocation Program, and assisted him in getting off drugs and alcohol. They gave him a new identity, but he was constantly moving from one location to another.

He kept in touch with people from his past, but avoided those he knew could get him into trouble. His humor is one of the things that has kept him going, Hill says.

Visitors to his Web site are greeted with the words, "You want to enter my site. Then leave your piece at the door."

Those who click that they don't want to do so are sent to an anger management Web site.

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