Seeking Psychics: Consumers Look to Outside Help for Financial Advice

Psychics Claim Clients Concerned More About Finance Than Romance

People don't need a crystal ball to see the economy's turmoil, but nevertheless, some have turned to psychics psychics to get advice about their financial life.

Virginia resident Pam Jenkins has been seeing New York psychic Carmen Harra since 2002, but with the economy in trouble, her inquiries have turned from trying to contact her deceased relatives toward questions about her financial future.

VIDEO: People look to soothsayers to provide confidence in economic crisis.
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Facing possible foreclosure on her home, she asked her most trusted adviser, Harra, for some insight about the situation.

"I would take her advice over any financial planner and any lawyer any day," Jenkins said.

She said that her financial stress resulted from the fact that she'd got caught with a subprime loan after refinancing her home to add a pool.

Jenkins, who mostly communicates with Harra via telephone, was ready to pack up and leave her beloved residence because of the foreclosure troubles when Harra gave her a boost to stay and fight for her home.

Though Harra said she saw issues surrounding the home, the psychic added that she thought Jenkins was not supposed to go.

"'You're supposed to hang in there, and this is all going to turn around in your favor,'" Jenkins said Harra told her.

With those suggestive words, Jenkins had the confidence to persevere. Her situation hasn't been resolved, but so far, Jenkins has kept her home.

"[Here] we are some two years later, still in that house against a whole lot of odds," said Jenkins, who is a court reporter.

Harra, who has been in the business more than 25 years and sees on average 1,000 clients a year, said she is careful about the advice she gives.

"It's a lot of responsibility. You take someone's life in your hands, so you have to be very careful about the kind of advice you give someone like Pam, who is about to lose their home," Harra said.

Reaching Out for 'Intuitive' Answers

Harra said for her clients, money is now the No. 1 topic.

"Everyone is sort of afraid," said Harra, who claimed to have had intuitive abilities her entire life. "They ask a lot about money and they are very concerned about their investments. They are concerned about their homes. They wonder if they will be able to keep their homes; and they wonder why this is happening, and when is this going to end and how is this going to transform into a better life."

A Psychic Boom?

Harra is just one of many psychics who claim clients are focusing more on their financial lives during session.

Some, like Maryanne Fiedler, a marketing director for an online network of about 160 psychics, believes the down economy has the psychic business booming.

The company's average sales are up 7½ percent when compared with the same time last year, said Fiedler, who is not a psychic.

"We have 10 percent more new members that are calling Psychic Source. More of our existing members are getting readings," Fiedler said. "So certainly, we can say the economy is having some effect on people who are reaching out to psychics for advice or counsel.

"People are calling them more often now to talk to them about their concerns about their career, their concerns about the economy," Fiedler said.

Fiedler said her soothsayers are not giving financial advice or suggesting to anyone how to invest their funds.

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