Missing Teen's Family Still Has Hope

Relatives of missing Alabama high school student Natalee Holloway say they won't leave the Caribbean island without her.

Wearing a bracelet honoring his stepdaughter, George "Jug" Twitty told "Good Morning America" this morning that the search for the missing teen continues with help from hundreds of people, including tourists.

Twitty said the family will do anything to find Holloway, including consulting a psychic, which her mother recently did. But, in spite of the fact that the searches have turned up nothing, the family has not given up.

"We still have hope," Twitty said. "I don't have any indication that there has been foul play."

Authorities arrested two men in the case, but say the suspects are not helping them locate Holloway. In addition to a special FBI diving team, local authorities have asked the FBI to bring in dogs specially trained to find people.

A judge was to determine today whether authorities have enough evidence to hold the two men, who deny any connection to the disappearance, said defense lawyer Chris Lejuez. He told The Associated Press that his clients were being investigated for murder and kidnapping.

Holloway's family says it has not received any request for ransom and there is no evidence that she has been kidnapped. The police have not ruled out an accidental death.

Holloway's family remains determined to find the missing honor student, who received a full academic scholarship to study pre-med at the University of Alabama in the fall.

"We're not going home without her," Twitty said.

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