Family survives lightning strike while camping

Christopher Lovera and his two children were watching a lightning storm from under a tree in Sequoia National Park when they were struck by lightning and sent airborne.
1:56 | 09/21/17

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Transcript for Family survives lightning strike while camping
Back now with that family lucky to be alive after surviving a lightning strike at their California campsite. Gio Benitez is here with more and, gio, this could happen to anybody. Unbelievable. It was labor day weekend and the family was enjoying its first ever backpacking trip. Suddenly everything went dark. They had been struck by lightning. All of them and this morning, they're alive to tell the tale. It happened in a heartbeat. Bolt of lightning crashing down on Christopher Lovera and his two children near sequoia national park earlier this month. Moments earlier the family had been shooting video of the storm hunkered down under a tree. They're not the faces of happy campers or happy backpackers right now. Reporter: But then lightning passing through that tree and into them sending the family airborne. Hikers across the lake capturing the frightening moments. It did? Yeah. They fell into the water. After that it was, you know, kind of waking up to kind of individual scenes of, you know, trauma. Reporter: Aidan and Nadia were the first to wake. When I first saw dad, I thought he was dead, but he says I didn't see him moving or breathing or anything. We'll help them. Reporter: Good samaritans swarming in to help and the family eventually airlifted to safety Christopher suffering second-degree burns. He and his son left with punctured eardrums their clothes shredded. Their shirt melted together. Reporter: Five times hotter than the surface of the sun they kill an average of 47 people in the U.S. Every year injuring hundreds more. And even though experts say not to stand by any trees, the family says they had no choice. They were in a forest. They just had to be there. Michael, back to you. Thank you, gio. Thank goodness they are okay. Very scary situation.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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