Hormonal birth control linked to increased breast cancer risk: Study

Women using hormonal birth control methods -- from the pill, to the ring and implants -- appeared to have a 20 percent higher risk of breast cancer, according to a new study of 1.8 million women in Denmark.
2:25 | 12/07/17

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Transcript for Hormonal birth control linked to increased breast cancer risk: Study
other families. To a "Gma" health alert about birth control and breast cancer. A new study in the new England journal of medicine says women who use the pill may face a higher risk. Dr. Ashton, you got to explain. Big story. This is the actual study hot off the presses. It came out of Denmark. They looked at 1.8 million women followed them for ten years, found that those women who took hormonal contraception and this includes the progesterone releasing iud as well as the newer generation low dose birth control pills face -- take a look -- up to 20 to 21% associated risk of breast cancer. The hard numbers I want people to know about results in 13 more cases of breast cancer for every 100,000 women but the real number I want to stick out in people's minds, robin, because so many young women and teenagers take the pill and are using the iud, this only increases the risk in that age group of 2 extra cases for 100 women under the age of 35 because breast cancer is uncommon in that age. Key to put that up but, okay, still people are going to be -- women will be concerned about this because it is a method that women use. You have to remember the benefits we talk about risks and benefits. Take a look at the list. There are a plethora of benefits to hormonal contrainvestigation ranging from a very effective way of preventing pregnancy. Known to low her the risk of ovarian and uterine cancer and manage endometriosis and treat acne and help women with their periods. You are board certified, ob/gyn. What's your advice. I think this is a significant important study. I think it has to be interpreted in the proper context. I think women need to remember the bisque, benefits and options and I think what's important about this study is the risk is different based on the woman's age and the duration of use so a woman in their 40s who faces a higher risk of breast cancer may want to consider other methods and if you're going to discontinue hormonal contraception because of this, I would recommend you stop drinking alcohol as well because that increases your risk. It has to be a conversation and, robin, my 18-year-old daughter is on the pill. I'm not going to recommend that she stop. Okay. You heard it here. It is important stuff and people should talk to their doctor. Their children and talk to their doctors. It is a dialogue. To your "Gma" moment, shall

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