Minnesota Woman Calls Out Catcallers

The 28-year-old secretly recorded her confrontation with the men she believed were harassing her.
3:24 | 07/25/14

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Transcript for Minnesota Woman Calls Out Catcallers
index," a Minnesota woman on a mission to stamp out what she considers harassment. She's confronting her so-called catcallers and get this, she's secretly recording their reactions. Our friends at buzzfeed first spotted this and going viral. Here's ABC's Linzie Janis for more. Reporter: Catcall confrontation. Where you going, doll? I got what you want. Reporter: Usually only seen on TV. You talking to me. Oh, we got a live one, boys. Reporter: Like on "Sex and the city" but now one Minneapolis woman is pouncing back. Minnesota chicks are hot, you say. He did. Which one? Reporter: And getting a little catty with her so-called street callers. All caught on camera. I'm just saying I love your dress. That's all. Just a compliment, sweetheart. I mow you mean it as a compliment but I don't take it as one. They're cultureated to say that. Reporter: 28-year-old Lindsey who's going to keep her last name private created cards against harassment last fall posting cards to hand out to those who comment on their appearance in public with saying like -- someone walking/jogging/biking in your line of sight isn't an invitation for you to comment. Just say hello. Reporter: They happen on her daily commute to work to a downtown office building. When you dress the way you are -- I'm dressed for work. These are my professional clothes. Reporter: But two weeks ago after she says she experienced so many of these interactions, she secretly started filming the men she gave her cards to and the videos went viral. I normally have a clutch and my phone so I just set my tone to be filming video. Reporter: We blurred the faces and changed the voices of the men who Lindsey claims are guilty of street harassment. If you smiled you would look beautiful? Why should I care if you think I look beautiful? Reporter: It irks you it goes on without any real attempt to curtail it. If women don't feel like they can use public spaces with the same safety that most men walk through the world feeling, then that's a problem. Reporter: Sometimes her confrontations illicit apologies. If I made you feel uncomfortable, I'm sorry. Reporter: But other. You have the freedom of speech to holler if you want to holler so it's my freedom to holler at you. I don't know that I'm changing hearts and minds but if they're annoying to me I'm allowed to be annoying back to them. She says she's gotten a number of e-mails from women's groups in other countries asking her to translate her cards into other languages or cultural experiences so that they can hand out their own cards. Now, guys, I have confronted catcallers before. When I was much younger with some not very nice words and that can be dangerous. This is a simple way of responding. Am I wrong that I actually take it as a compliment that I'm in my 40s. Thank you for saying that. I didn't want to say anything. You made my day. You like getting checked out. I don't hand out any cards. Just walk out in times square. It's generational, I think. I completely get you. We want to know how you deal with catcallers. Tweet us at "Gma" at #socialsquare. Anyway -- Yeah, yeah, just wait. I loved it. When I was much younger. How much younger? Next up -- our "Heat index." Just saying no to makeup.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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