Nikki Haley reacts to Charlottesville violence, Confederate monuments controversy

The U.N. ambassador spoke to ABC News' George Stephanopoulos about the national attention over Confederate symbols in Charlottesville and Trump's new strategy in Afghanistan.
2:27 | 08/22/17

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Transcript for Nikki Haley reacts to Charlottesville violence, Confederate monuments controversy
The president also talked about the need to heal our divisions at home. When you were governor of south Carolina after those horrific charlottesville murders you took on the white supremacists and you took down the confederate flag and you spoke out when the candidate trump was very slow to disavow David duke and the kkk. I want it show what you had to say then. We saw and looked at true hate in the eyes last year in Charleston. I will not stop until we fight a man that chooses not to disavow the kkk, that is not a part of our party. That's not who we want as president. We will not allow that in our country. Eventually candidate trump did disavow David duke and the kkk. But what were you thinking last week when you saw the president blame both sides for the vice in charlottesville? When you said that many very fine people were marching with the white supremacists. Well, I picked up the phone and I had a private conversation with the president about charlottesville and it was taken very well. What I will tell you is there is no room for bigotry and hate in this country. I know the pain that hate can cause. And we have to -- we have to isolate them the way they want to isolate others. Did the president understand he made a mistake? I think the president clarified so that no one can question that he's opposed to bigotry and hate in this country and that when our soldiers go out and fight they fight unified. We need to make sure we're a country that's unified back home. Yet he still says that taking down confederate statues is foolish. You took down the confederate flag from the statehouse in Charleston. You know, it was the state that decided but what our focus was the confederate flag was a living, breathing thing. It was representative of the here and now and there was no place for that, especially after we saw nine people murdered with that -- with the killer raising up the confederate flag and so that's why we brought it down. When the issue of monuments came up in South Carolina at that same time, we knew that we couldn't take down every monument or change every street sign or change the name of every university because there's history all throughout south Carolina, but instead what we did is we worked with the mayor of Charleston to work on building an African memorial and African museum and that's what's happening right now so it's not just about what Y take down but what you proactively do to lift up your state and country. Ambassador Haley, thanks for your time this morning. Okay, thanks so much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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