It Took a Physicist to Solve the Earphone-Tangling Problem

Robert Matthews of England's Aston University has researched knots and how to avoid them.
0:55 | 07/08/14

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

More information on this video
Enhanced full screen
Explore related content
Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for It Took a Physicist to Solve the Earphone-Tangling Problem
Ear -- are always of course getting tangled I don't know about you guys stop -- in my pocket all the -- that now if physicists have come up. With an idea for how we can keep them on tape that was -- a graphic of exactly. How you're supposed to keep them basically. What you what you have to do is -- to connect the earbud. The -- together and put them into an audio Jack in that will. Help you know entangled and this -- this up businesses he had his students check them out he's a physicist at Aston university in Birmingham. And a biochemist -- -- working on DNA and they -- that -- molecules also get tangled in this professors finding suggests that nature sometimes break up forms in. I just want to say well -- what are these mice ear -- my back and look at some months -- well because of because I used his formula. But it -- about -- it -- there must be something about -- break.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"id":24466203,"title":"It Took a Physicist to Solve the Earphone-Tangling Problem","duration":"0:55","description":"Robert Matthews of England's Aston University has researched knots and how to avoid them.","section":"GMA","mediaType":"Default"}