New report states hot car deaths can occur even in cooler weather

Consumer Reports found that being left in vehicles poses a threat to children and pets year round.
2:51 | 10/06/17

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Transcript for New report states hot car deaths can occur even in cooler weather
We switch gears and a parenting alert about hot cars. Usually we're worried about it in the summer. Now a new report concludes the risk is real even when the weather cools down. Gio is here with that. Hey, George, good morning to you. Such an important issue here. So far this year 39 children have died in hot cars including a 5-month-old who died in may after being left in a car on a 76-degree Idaho day. Take a look. We see these images in the summer month, children left in hot cars, but a new report shows it can happen year round. It can happen even in the mildest temperatures. Our vehicles kind of ago like a greenhouse. Reporter: "Consumer reports" putting that to the test. Even when the temperature outside is in the cooler 60s and 70s the temperature inside a closed car can reach a critical level and met up with Jennifer Stockburger, "Consumer reports'" director of operations at its test track. These are two brand-new cars. The threat of hot car deaths isn't specific to a car's make and model. So "Consumer reports" set up a demonstration of their test with two different cars in different colors to see if the lighter car stayed cooler than the darker one. Inside, car seats and temperature readers where the child would be sitting with the doors open, the temperature in each car is in the mid-70s. About 74 degrees. We're looking at around 76, 75. Clock starts right now. We're two minutes in and we can see how quickly this is heating up. You got ten degrees about from where we started. Reporter: After 30 minute, 98 degrees. 98.3. It's going higher and we've got 94 degrees. Fast forward to the hour mark. We've got 99.2 in the white car, an hour in and in the darker car, 104 degrees. That 1205 range is where babies are in trouble. That's still going to go higher. Reporter: Child safety expert Jeanette fennel reminds us a child's body is incredibly vulnerable. They don't have the ability to get that heat out of their body. They're going to heat up three to five times faster than an adult. Reporter: What about that theory that lighter cars are cooler? We're seeing about five degrees of a difference but really when you're talking about a small child, in the car, that doesn't matter. Right and that's what woo E wanted to demonstrate. Doesn't matter if you're in a light colored car, light interior, you should never leave any child unattended in a car. For sure. Child safety experts and legislators are you Aring autouakers to include technology that will remind parents their child is in the backseat and already exists for at least one car model. You know, there are free apps available including, you know, that traffic app waze. That will remind you that your child is in the backseat. It's so important. Yeah. So many people have that already. That was an eye-opening piece. Thanks so much, gio. We switch gears and turn to

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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