Royal Hospital Hoax: End to Shock-Jock Pranks?

Americans wonder whether U.S. shock jocks will have to change their ways after Australian hoax.
2:01 | 12/11/12

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Transcript for Royal Hospital Hoax: End to Shock-Jock Pranks?
Back at 7:42, with more on the fallout on that hoax by australian deejays. American shock jocks have been going over the line for years. Does this tragic episode mark the end of their funny business? Abc's linsey davis has the story. Hello there. Could I please speak to kate, please, my granddaughter? Reporter: The australian deejays who made this prank call have gone radio silent. Their show canceled. And the station issuing a company-wide suspension of prank calls, after the anurse that was on their call, apparently committed suicide. Jay nice has a regular prank segment on his show. Entertainers try to use real-life everyday circumstances and try to find humor in it. Reporter: He says his station has no intentions of pulling the plug on prank calls. And they don't need to, based on u.S. Law, where such calls only become problematic when it was proclaimed the act would cause damage or injury. Hello. This is sarah. How are you? Reporter: Sarah palin was famously pranked when she was running for vice president, by a montreal-based comedy duo, pretending to be french president nicolas sarkozy. A prank caller made his way through security to speak to tony blair while he was prime minister. Hello, tony? Yes. It's william haig. It's a quite good imitation. Reporter: But it was no laughing matter in 1998, when opie and anthony, deejays from a boston radio station were fired by telling listeners on april fool's day, that the mayor had died. While the australian deejay's show has been terminated, it's not sure if they will be. She was giving us real information. Reporter: The same joke they initially laughed at is now the reason for their tears. Linsey davis, abc news, new york.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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