NFL Star's Alleged Killer's Confession Played in Court

Defense attorneys for the man accused of Sean Taylor's killing say the confession was coerced.
4:17 | 10/29/13

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Transcript for NFL Star's Alleged Killer's Confession Played in Court
the trial of the accused killer of nfl star shaean taylor, shot and killed during a burglary of his home. The defendant, a key confession that was played for the jury. Now, the defense must persuade the jury not to believe what they heard. Gio benitez tracking this for us. Reporter: For the first time since taylor's killing six years ago, we're getting a look at the controversial videotape played for the jury thursday. And listen closely because this tape could affect the whole case. This morning, video of eric rivera's apparent confession, after police say he shot washington redskins safety sean taylor in 2007. In the nfl star's own miami home. On the right, you see severe ra, then 17, speaking with the detective. How many times did you shoot him? Once. Do you know where you shot him? In his leg. How quickly did he go down? Quick. Reporter: Police say rivera shot 24-year-old taylor in the upper thigh, which severed his femoral artery. Police believe it started as a botched burglary, that rivera and four others wanted to steal cash and thought taylor's home was empty. What were you planning to do to sean taylor's home? Get some money. Burglarizing the house? Yes. Reporter: Rivera's attorney says this confession was coerced. Prosecutors point to this diagram they say rivera drew, showing where he was at the time of the shooting. Monday in court, rivera's father taking the stand, saying he wasn't there, when the video was taped. Telling jurors, he was searching for his son at local police stations. Prosecutors say rivera came to the police station willingly and refused to call his parents. I went to see how he was doing. Is he okay? Yeah. He's my son. He was a kid at the point. At that point. And any parent is concerned about their son. Reporter: Rivera has pleaded not guilty and could face life in prison if convicted. Closing argumen may begin as early as tomorrow. And the 12-person jury will likely begin deliberations later this week. One of rivera's co-defendants has pleaded guilty. Three others are awaiting trial. Gio, thank you. We're going to turn to abc's chief legal anchor, dan abrams now. And looking at the confession tape. Is there anything you saw, the conduct of the police, anything that the defense can use? The best thing the defense has going for it, is how hard the tape is to hear. It is a really tough tape to understand and to hear. That's not a good sign for the defense. But that's the best thing they have going for them. They're bringing in the father to say, this was a kid. I couldn't find him. I was looking all over for him. Effectively, the father is saying the police take him off, pull him in, question him. The problem is, that you still do have what he said on that tape. It is very hard after a judge has admitted a confession like this, for the defense to be in the position of effectively cat catchup. I know you hear that on the tape. But it was coerced. Did the police play games with him? Did they have one of the co-defendants walk past him so he could get nervous? Absolutely. But when it comes to saying that this tape is so untrustworthy, the defense hasn't presented anything. It's not just the tape. The diagrams he drew of the house and where people were. It's a very specific confession. The defense would say some of the co-defendants had been to the house before, so they knew the house. But that doesn't prove anything. The problem is, it's all of it taken together. The big question now, of course, is going to be, is it possible does he beat this thing? Do you think he will? No. It goes the difference between explaining away evidence to actually having to explain evidence. So, if he takes the stand, he doesn't get to say this shouldn't be considered. He has to explain exactly what he was doing before. When you have a defense that's going as poorly as I think this one is, you never know extremely unlikely. Thanks so much, dan. Appreciate it.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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