Snorkeler Comes Face-to-Face with 18-Foot Sea Monster

The Catalina Island Marine Institute employee dragged the dead Oarfish was dragged to shore.
1:32 | 10/16/13

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Transcript for Snorkeler Comes Face-to-Face with 18-Foot Sea Monster
Someone off the coast of california came face-to-face with this 18-foot-long sea monster. Abc's nick watt has the story. Reporter: A snorkeler off the coast of catalina island, came face-to-face with this. A fish with the eye the size of a grown man's fist. Oh, my goodness. Is this "deep rising"? "Open water"? And "20,000 leagues under the sea" all rolled into one? The brave snorkeler who happens to work for the catalina island marine institute, dragged the monster to shore by the tail, where it took 15 people to pick it up for this photo. What in the name of neptune is this thing? These creatures are found in deep sea. Reporter: Oarfish, the longest bony fish known to man, can reach 56 feet long. And they live a half-mile down beneath the waves. And this one is a relative tiddler at 18 feet. This is the only one filmed in its natural habitat. What will the people of catalina do with their sea monster? We would like to take the oarfish and keep its skeleton. Reporter: A memento of the one that did not get away. For "good morning america," nick watt, abc news, los angeles.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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