More States Take Action to Protect Kids Left in Hot Cars

Four states recently passed good Samaritan laws that allow people to remove a child from a hot car without facing legal challenges.
3:18 | 07/09/15

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Transcript for More States Take Action to Protect Kids Left in Hot Cars
"Gma on the lookout" and the dangers of leaving children in hot cars. We see the tragic results every year and ABC's gio Benitez found out just how quickly your temperature can rise in a hot car. Good morning, gio. Reporter: This is really important. An 11-month-old baby just died last night in Florida this way so experts stress it can happen to any parent. Watch as quick thinking good samaritans see the unthinkable. Children left behind in hot cars like this man in Kentucky. You okay? Confronting the child's father when he returned. Is that your kid in the back. Do you think that's a smart thing to do. Reporter: This infant found locked in a car in a Houston mall parking lot. Security guards rushing to the rescue. The mother later coming out of a store begging for her son. The mother pleaded guilty to child abandonment charges. Four states recently passing good samaritan laws allowing people to rescue a child from a hot car without facing legal challenges. Five other states are currently working on legislation. Experts say children's body temperatures rise much faster than adults. Heat up three to five times faster. Reporter: And the results can be deadly. To experience the toll it can take on an adult body, I teamed up with paramedics in Pennsylvania. Paul Dunn checks my body temperature. 98.3. Reporter: Okay. Textbook perfect. Reporter: And hooks me up to a heart monitor before we lock ourselves in this minivan. I'm wired up about 90 degrees outside. It didn't take long to feel the heat. Cozy. You're up to 100.8 already. Wow, I went from 98.3 to 100.8 in like a minute. The temperature inside the van climbing more than ten degrees in a matter of 20 minutes. I mean we're just dripping sweat everywhere. Yeah. This is extremely uncomfortable. Reporter: 29 minutes in -- We're up to 2. Reporter: Paul checking the monitor notices I've had two irregular heartbeats. A sign my heart is feeling the heat. 105 so at this point most children would not be sustaining. We would have a critically ill child. Reporter: My body temperature of 105 proven to be deadly for children so we play it safe and call it. Opening the door. Oh, thank god. Reporter: Jeannette fennel says most involve parents forgetting. I think the most important thing to do is realize that this can happen to anyone. Reporter: And, remember, since the car seat for infants is usually rear facing you might not ever see the baby from the front so you want to end up putting things you usually grab like your purse or even your phone, you want to put those in the backseat so you're always going back here to grab it. Another tip also, you want to get a stuffed animal like this and you want to go ahead and put it in the front seat of the car every single time that your baby is in the back. That way when you're driving, you look, you see that stuffed animal and you remember your child is in the back, robin. All great suggestions and tips.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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