3 Steps to Stay Positive and Motivated

Time magazine reveals how positivity, rewards and even peer pressure can help motivate you.
3:06 | 07/02/14

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Transcript for 3 Steps to Stay Positive and Motivated
You can do it well, but you should work with a nutritionist. Great advice. Something else burning up the heat index. And time.com, trending here this morning. It's interesting. It's about motivation. We make lists for ourselves, we don't check anything off on the list. And they say the real reason is we ignore our emotions. This comes from the studies they put together. We can't ignore emotions, the ways our brains are structured, thoughts and feelings win regardless of the list. For example, you have things to do, but you would rather be doing something else within the positive feeling, do it. Stay positive, but reward yourself afterwards. When you check it off, give the dog a bone. Saying reward yourself. Exactly. Or -- I think that is smart to incentivize yourself. That makes doing the list the positive thing. And peer pressure, a lot of talk about peer pressure being a horrible thing. Listen to this, surround yourself with the people you like, and people who achieve things that you want to achieve, and then you live up to expectations. Because you're feeling good, positive, you like your company. That's why I showed up this week. I'm feeling really positive and it's going well. We're feeling better too. Thanks. Next up, we have dancing with the stars Julian huff breaking up with Ryan Seacrest. She failed to speak her mind, and worried about the constant need to be perfect. And wonders if it would have been different if she was more open. All of that has changed with her current boyfriend, hockey player brooks lake. Did I say that right? You can read more of her interview when it hits news stands July 8th. That's an evolution we have been through. Yeah. The need, the pressure to be perfect all the time. Especially when you have cameras following you. And you're on camera, when you're with that special somebody, you want to be yourself. Good for her. Finally let her guard down. And how to deal with the pet peeves. You know the loud gum chewing people, or those people who give you back-handed compliments. One of the most popular stories from the Wall Street journal this morning. On how to get over social allergies. You can try different tactics. Here's a few, cut the person some slack, avoid them. Maybe gently address the issue. Hey, man, you really bother me. Not like that. Yeah, that's -- exhucuse me, please don't do that. Or change your behavior. Which do you follow? Change your own behavior. Don't take it too seriously. It's not you. It's them. Yeah. That was really deep, Amy. Avoiding -- I think that's the go-to rooe reaction, but not right call. And cutting slack, and understanding they may be having a tough day. You never know what they are dealing with. Good to remember. And a summer of love for a

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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