Viral Anti-Obesity Ad Points Finger for Unhealthy Eating Habits

The PSA raises questions about where responsibility lies for weight problems.
3:42 | 08/14/14

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Transcript for Viral Anti-Obesity Ad Points Finger for Unhealthy Eating Habits
this morning, a dramatic and startling anti-obesity campaign going viral right now that points a finger at parents for their kids' unhealthy eating habits even when they're not kids anymore and ABC's Brandi Hitt has our story. Heart attack. Reporter: Overweight and nearly dead, this shocking anti-obesity campaign chronicling a 300-pound pan's life in reverse. Imagining each ice cream, soda, fast food binge and video game marathon. All the way back to his childhood. Deep dish. You have to make a change. Reporter: The sobering images are exactly what doctors at children's health care of Atlanta want the public to see. Their 2012 ad resurfacing this week now going viral. We're hoping parents take away that they have the ability to impact their child's future and their child's health. Reporter: While some are finding it effective -- You see something that is a little bit disturbing you might remember it when you're at the store. Reporter: There's also backlash. I still can't believe you give this child French fries. I know. It'll the only thing that will make him stop. Reporter: One writing online the video puts way too much blame on everyone else and takes the blame off the supposed victim. Another adding "Neither fat-shaming nor scare tactics work." Though this is alarming and it's very hard for parents to hear this, they need to hear it because they need to realize all the things that they're doing wrong. Unintentionally but still wrong. The first step to actually making change is considering change and that's what we were trying to tart with this video. Reporter: The video's creator say people need to take responsibility for their choices. Hope this message will break dangerous habits before they begin. For "Good morning America," Brandi Hitt, ABC news, los Angeles. So joining us is ABC news senior medical contributor, doctorfer. I'll go with it. In the new dictionary. Behind acquihire. Where does the responsibility lie in your opinion? It's a little bit like looking into a medical crystal ball when you're talking about someone living with morbid obesity this is the outcome that we see in our doctor brains, you know, that train only goes usually in one direction, unfortunately. Now, as a mom, there's more than enough guilt to go around. We all know that and we don't need one more reason but I do think it is a reminder there are things under our control for at least some amount of time and that's what we should try to -- Do you think it's a good way to get the message out or is this fat-shaking as some have said. I did a year of research working with morbidly obese patients and saw a lot of fat-shaming and sometimes even from within the medical community and that's wrong. Either way. But I think that the real issue or problem with this video is that it implies there's just one reason for obesity and we know that is not true. Part of it is behavior but part is genetic, hormonal, metabolic. The list goes on and on. With a few seconds left, the mom shoveling the French fries in, my mom didn't do that but let me have they will. Isn't moderation the key. We all try to do the best we can. We have to lead by example but also have to remember that habits tart young and, again, things in moderation. I have given a French fry to both of my children. I'll admit of the we all have. Of course. We're just going to say it right here. Doctorfer. Jennifer Ashton. You can understand how that happened. Great advice. We asked our parents, are parents to blame for their kids being obese? 81% said yes. 19% said no.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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