Running From Depression?

For patients who are mildly depressed, while it may not be easy, it is more realistic to think that an exercise regimen can be pulled off. While it remains unclear as to whether this exercise will treat depression, there are clearly additional benefits that make it well worth trying.

Perhaps the biggest benefit is on weight, an issue for many a depressed patient as both the illness and the medication treatment of it can cause weight gain. The other huge benefit is on general health, as exercise reduces risk of many illnesses including heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

But all treatments have side effects, and exercise is no exception.

The downside to an exercise prescription is that if people think they should be exercising and are not able to fire up the willpower to get it done, they can experience more of the guilt and self-loathing that they already have in abundance from the depression itself.

So there is a balance to be struck between pushing for more exercise if it can be accomplished vs. accepting that the depression has made this impossible for the time being.

That will do it for now. Time to go for a run. I will, incidentally be passing by Meadowbrook, home of Michael Phelps' North Baltimore Aquatic Club, on my route.

Yes, we are very proud here in Baltimore!

Dr. James Potash is an associate professor of psychiatry and co-director of the Mood Disorders Program at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail moods@jhu.edu. To participate in our genetic and clinical studies, call 1-877-MOODS-JH.

-- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5627302. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5627302. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5627302. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5627302. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5627302. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5627302.
Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: Left, Sabrina Allen, 4, is shown in this photo provided by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children; right, Sabrina Allen, 17, is seen in this undated handout photo.
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children|Courtesy of PI Phillip Klein
Kelly Ripa
Seth Poppel/Yearbook Library
PHOTO: Earths moon is pictured as observed in visible light, left, topography, center, and the GRAIL gravity gradients, right.
NASA/GSFC/JPL/Colorado School of Mines/MIT