Stroke May Be Striking at a Younger Age

He speculated that if a trend exists it could be due to risk factors for stroke, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes and obesity. "People in their middle-age need to realize they need to control these risk factors," Isaacson added.

And he agreed that doctors need to do more to help younger people with mild strokes re-enter their lives.

"Neurologists do not obtain enough information to determine whether a patient will have difficulty with returning to work, family and other life events," Isaacson said. "A lot of times we don't realize that this person needs occupational therapy to help them focus in getting back to full participation in their previous activities."

More information

For more information on stroke, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: Timothy J. Wolf, O.T.D., M.S.CI., O.T.R/L, instructor, occupational therapy and neurology and investigator for the Cognitive Rehabilitation Research Group, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.; Richard Isaacson, M.D., assistant professor, neurology and medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine; September/October 2009, American Journal of Occupational Therapy

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