Grapefruit, Pomegranate Juice Not a Good Mix With Statins

Recently, I talked about a study on "Good Morning America" showing that although statins effectively reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, they also appear to reduce patients' levels of energy and activity. I discussed five ways to deal with the problem of low energy or fatigue while on statins.

The response was tremendous, and I have learned what my own patients have been telling me for some time -- not all people tolerate statins without side effects. Complaints of memory problems, fatigue, low energy and muscle weakness were fairly common -- although with more than 13 million users, it is hard to know how many people suffer overall.

Yet, giving people the heads-up that side effects can occur while on statins is important. I believe many patients are led to think they are crazy when their doctors tell them that the symptoms aren't likely from statins, or the doctors wrongly attribute the symptoms to something else rather than try to stop the statins, lower the dose or switch to another brand.

So many doctors believe the statin drugs are so safe and effective that the "joke," or discussion, in the medical community is that perhaps most healthy adults would benefit from a low dose of statins just to prevent heart disease.

"Perhaps we should put statins in the drinking water," a few will suggest.

Back to the reason for this piece!! In the segment, I included the suggestion to try juices high in antioxidants such as pomegranate juice, a recommendation learned from my patients over the years. However, I also noted on the show that grapefruit juice should be avoided as it could interfere with metabolism of the statin medication and raise the drug level and potential side effects even more.

An astute viewer alerted me that there is a similar interaction of pomegranate juice with statins and that pomegranate juice should also be avoided. I did a little homework and found that a study performed on rats (which means we don't know if the effect will be the same in humans) in Japan and published in 2005 did find that pomegranate juice, like grapefruit juice, could potentially interfere with the metabolism of certain medications.

Fruits and many pure unsweetened fruit juices are great sources of antioxidants, vitamins, potassium and fiber and are an essential part of a heart-healthy diet. Yet, with so many people on statins to treat or prevent heart disease and stroke, it would seem that much more attention should be paid to the grapefruit and pomegranate fruit interaction with statins.

Perhaps these juices should add this potential interaction on their labels and include the information in their marketing campaigns. I know that I will do my part to spread the word to my patients and audiences that I speak to.

Many viewers asked about the origin of the study on statins and fatigue. The research was done by Dr. Beatrice Golomb and presented at the American Heart Association's 49th Annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention held March 10 to 14 in Palm Harbor, Fla.

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