Stricter Laws Needed to Keep Kids Away From Tanning Beds

Federal safety officials crack down on indoor tanning beds.
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Ever since junior high school and throughout her teens and 20s, there was one place you could surely find Kelly Wiley at least four or five times a week - the tanning salon.

"I was going on vacation with family, and they took me to get a base tan so I wouldn't burn," said Wiley, who is now 31.

She continued her weekly ritual until one day about two years ago. She found a strange spot on her belly and decided to get it checked out. Then, she got the news that changed everything.

"I had a biopsy and the next day. I got a call and found out it was melanoma. I stopped tanning right away."

Back then, there were no laws to keep girls like Wiley out of salons. Now, more than 30 states have laws restricting minors' access to indoor tanning beds. Despite that, a new study suggests these regulations are not keeping teens out of tanning salons.

The study, published in the latest issue of the American Journal of Public Health, found after interviewing more than 6,000 teenagers ages 14 to 17 over a one-year period, 17.1 percent of girls and 3.2 percent of boys used indoor tanning within that year. The data also showed that about the same number of teens went tanning in states with laws that have age restrictions or require parental consent. Older teenage girls went tanning most often.

"Our data, as well as those of others, suggest that the current laws ... are not working," wrote the authors, led by Joni A. Mayer of the Institute for Behavioral and Community Health in San Diego.

The researchers go on to say there are a number of reasons the laws may not be working -- parents may allow children to go tanning, children go to facilities that don't require parental consent, parents and teenagers may not be aware of the laws or the age limit of states requiring consent is too low.

"The high rate of indoor tanning by older adolescent girls suggests that better laws are needed, preferably in the form of bans for those younger than 18 years," the authors wrote.

In the summer of 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, part of the World Health Organization (WHO), placed tanning beds in its Class 1 carcinogen category, the same classification given to cigarettes, plutonium and ultraviolet radiation from the sun.

WHO, as well as the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Academy of Dermatology and the American Medical Association support banning teens from going to tanning salons. Last year, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel met to assess the risks of indoor tanning. In addition, a number of states are now considering stricter laws, and the health care reform bill imposes a 10 percent tax on customers at tanning salons.

The Indoor Tanning Association, a group that represents thousands of tanning equipment manufacturers, distributors, salon owners and their members responded to the AAP's statement on the need to outlaw teen tanning. The association said on its web site the decision about whether to allow teens to tan should be left up to parents and that scientific evidence showing a relationship between ultraviolet radiation and melanoma is inconclusive.

Despite the laws that are already in place, experts say regulations need to be even stricter, including the outright ban supported by advocacy organizations. Parents and children need to be better educated about the dangers of tanning, because it seems that message isn't getting through.

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