Doctors Volunteer to Help Save Syrian Refugees in Jordan Hospital

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Early last week, when an American strike on Syria seemed all but imminent, Akbik, whose wealthy family still lives in the Syrian capital, said he understood why the refugees were counting on it.

"This is the line for their life," he said. "This is it. Everything for them [is] now, all hands on deck. This is it. This is it. This is their hope.

"I cannot imagine what their reaction is going to be if they heard that U.S. pulled out or that the strike is not going to happen," he said at the time.

While Raged waited for further treatment, her new roommate arrived -- another girl, 14-year-old Khetan, with a similar injury. Last month, Khetan was fleeing her home with her family when a sniper's bullet tore through the door of their moving car and passed straight through her body.

Two emergency surgeries kept her alive, but she lost 30 pounds. Her insides were shredded and she needed another surgery to have her intestines sewn back together -- a procedure she couldn't get in the refugee camp where she lives.

She and her family traveled to the Amman hospital -- a journey that left them almost penniless, their clothes carried to the hospital in two trash bags -- where she was examined by Dr. Abdelnaby. She was to spend the next two days trying to rebuild Khetan's decimated stomach and trying to relieve Raged's agony.

The two girls, lying side by side in the hospital, would not see or hear President Assad tell Charlie Rose on PBS that he was at war with Islamic militants.

"If the American administration wanted to support Al Qaeda, go ahead. That what ... we have to tell them," Assad said. "You are creating havoc in the region, and if this region is not stable, the whole world cannot be."

The parents of both girls waited anxiously to find out if their daughters would survive their next round of surgeries, as doctors rushed to treat Raged, Khetan and the dozens of other Syrian refugees who make the dangerous journey to the hospital.

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