30 Injured, 1 Missing in Monster Storm Typhoon Neoguri

PHOTO: This visible image of Typhoon Neoguri in the East China Sea was taken by the MODIS instrument aboard NASAs Aqua satellite in the early morning of July 8, 2014.
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Typhoon Neoguri is engulfing Japan's islands, bringing flooding and tornadoes, officials said today.

And images of the terrifying super storm released by NASA reveal the breadth and strength of the tropical cyclone.

Powerful Images of Typhoon Neoguri Show Storm's Strength

As of Wednesday morning, the monster storm, expected to be one of the largest to hit Japan this summer, has left 30 people in Okinawa injured and 38,000 homes without power, authorities said. One fisherman has been reported missing off the northern island of Kyushu, according to the Associated Press.

PHOTO: This false-colored infrared image of Supertyphoon Neoguri was taken by the AIRS instrument aboard NASAs Aqua satellite on the afternoon of July 6, 2014.
Ed Olsen/NASA JPL
PHOTO: This false-colored infrared image of Supertyphoon Neoguri was taken by the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on the afternoon of July 6, 2014.

Neoguri has toppled trees, flooded cars and bent railings on the southern island of Okinawa, the AP reports.

According to Japan's Meteorological Agency, the typhoon is moving at a rate of 9 mph with sustained winds at 67 mph. Though Neoguri has been weakening, the island of Kyushu is still threatened by landslides and floods. Much of eastern Japan is threatened by tornadoes and extreme lightning, the agency said.

Neoguri is expected to reach Japan's major cities -- Tokyo, Kyoto and Osaka -- on the island of Honshu, by Thursday.

PHOTO: The MODIS instrument aboard NASAs Terra satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Neoguri on the evening of July 4, 2014 as it moved through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
PHOTO: The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Neoguri on the evening of July 4, 2014 as it moved through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

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