'Things Will Get Worse and Not Better'

As Lebanese leaders meet in Doha this week, they are hoping for a change in government that would give the Hezbollah-led coalition more power, even a veto over major government decisions.

Wadih Dib, a political science student who supports the opposition, sees violence as a necessary part of bringing about that change.

"[The sitting government] is trying to impose the American will," said Dib.

"I'm completely satisfied of the way the opposition responded. After all we can't succeed without blood," he said.

Ali Saayed, an accounting student from the Beirut Arab University, is a Shiite supporter of Hezbollah.

Hezbollah is considered a terrorist group in the West, but its supporters in Lebanon see it as a political, military and social organization that holds dozens of seats in the Lebanese parliament. For its supporters, Hezbollah's self-styled identity as a resistance movement against Israel is sacred.

"Prime Minister [Fouad] Siniora's government and America are launching war against [Hezbollah]," said Ali Saayed. "For us as Shiites we are obliged to defend it."

Hwaida Saad contributed to this article.

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