Unveiling the Lone Female Cop in Kandahar

Earlier this year, Afghan Finance Minister Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai told reporters the pledged $4.5 billion was not enough to pay for the huge cost of rebuilding the war-torn country.

The economic situation outside Kabul — where four-wheel-drives bearing the names of various aid agencies ply the streets secured by International Security Assistance Force troops and trendy restaurants cater to the "internationals" — is abysmal by all accounts.

"There are nice conferences and offices in Kabul," says Kakar. "But what we need now is money for the government so we can improve our country."

Given the circumstances, Kakar believes the title of Kandahar's only policewoman — unfortunately — will be hers for some time now.

"I would love to have more women in the police force," she says. "But I don't see it happening in the near future. First of all, because there's no money in this and then, this is Afghanistan — women and men in most cases work in separate places and of course I work with men all the time. Other women wouldn't feel comfortable in such a situation."

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
  • |
  • 3
  • |
  • 4
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
Newborns at this hospital on Christmas Day get the special stockings as a keepsake.
Magee-Womens Hospital at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
PHOTO: The Broadway musical, Rent, opened on Christmas Eve in Havana, Cuba.
Theo Zierock for ABC News
PHOTO: St. Louis Police officers guard the entrance to the Cathedral Basilica before Midnight Mass as protesters held a candlelight vigil, Dec. 24, 2014, in St. Louis.
Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/AP Photo