Arizona Girl Scouts Vying for World Record of Most Cookies Sold in One Day

PHOTO: The girls used the hype of Super Bowl weekend to boost their sales.
Girl Scouts Arizona Cactus-Pine
The girls used the hype of Super Bowl weekend to boost their sales.

Tom Brady wasn't the only one attempting to tackle a world record for Super Bowl 2015.

For the first 24 hours of Super Bowl weekend, the Girl Scouts Arizona Cactus-Pine in Phoenix sought to set the very first Guinness Book World Record for the most Girl Scout cookies sold.

From Friday, 3 p.m. to Saturday 3 p.m., the troops pulled in sales of $355,000 -- unofficially topping Guinness' new category requirement of $75,000.

"We wanted to have a category special to cookie sales," said Heather Thornton, communications manager of Girl Scouts–Arizona Cactus-Pine Council. "They do have records for other goods sold, but not for cookies."

PHOTO: Girl Scouts Arizona Cactus-Pine attempting to break Guinness World Record. Girl Scouts Arizona Cactus-Pine
Girl Scouts Arizona Cactus-Pine attempting to break Guinness World Record.

According to Guinness' website, aspiring record setters may apply to create a new category.

After submitting a request, Thornton told ABC News that Guinness opened the category of cookie sales for the Arizona Cactus-Pine Council with the condition that they break the $75,000 mark in a 24-hour period.

With Super Bowl XLIX taking place at the University of Phoenix stadium, the scouts took full advantage of the tourism and potentially new customers -- selling roughly 88,756 boxes to Thin Mint and Tagalong-lovers face-to-face.

"Boothing is a major way for the girls to make sales," Thornton said. "We worked with grocery stores and retailers. For Super Bowl weekend we focused on going to restaurants in the area, as well as Cityscape, which was hosting a Super Bowl event. We also had a huge car show in town."

PHOTO: The record category was created by Guinness on behalf of the Girl Scouts. Girl Scouts Arizona Cactus-Pine
The record category was created by Guinness on behalf of the Girl Scouts.

Six hundred troops participated in the event, with an estimated 5,000 to 6,000 girls attempting to set the world record.

"They were all excited," Thornton said. "They [Guinness] approved us for attempting the record. What we do now is submit copies of deposit slips, written accounts of how it happened, and photos of the girls selling in different locations throughout the valley."

The approval process, Thornton said, is expected to take eight to 10 weeks.

All documents must be reviewed by the Guinness' adjudicators before verifying that any record has been broken.

Guinness World Records told ABC News that they have not yet received evidence from the Girl Scouts Arizona Cactus-Pine.