Ann Coulter on the 'Liberal Mob,' Anthony Weiner's 'Sexting' Scandal and Being Labeled as an 'Angry Conservative'

A Softer Side of Ann Coulter?
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To say that conservative political pundit Ann Coulter is outspoken is quite the understatement.

Her brash commentary that comes with guns drawn against liberals has earned her some nasty labels. She has been called a fascist, lying liar, a huckster of ideological hate and the Paris Hilton of post-modern politics; none of which, Coulter said, bothers her.

"Not in the least," she said. "The only people who hate me more than liberals are conservative authors who don't sell as many books as I do."

Coulter's latest and eighth book, "Demonic: How the Liberal Mob is Endangering America," out in stores today, seems to be begging for more controversy. In one passage, she writes, "Just as fire seeks oxygen, Democrats seek power, which is why they will always be found championing the mob whether the mob consists of Democrats lynching blacks or Democrats slandering the critics of ObamaCare as racists."

Her book's basic thesis says liberals and the Democratic Party operate as a mob because they shout down opponents, engage in name-calling and incite passions with readymade slogans. Coulter denied that any Republican or conservative figures pulled the same sort of stunts.

Read an excerpt of Ann Coulter's "Demonic" here.

"It's not exactly calling Democrats demonic, it's the mob that are demonic," she said. "I'm against mobs. ... I'm not saying go out and punch a Democrat today, but when the mob arises ... you overreact to a mob because you can't reason with a mob."

Coulter, 49, even went as far as to say Rep. Anthony Weiner's "sexting" scandal was consistent with the liberal "mob characteristic" of "attacking" the person who released his information.

"Conservatives respond to their sex scandals differently because we don't elevate our leaders," she told George Stephanopoulos on "Good Morning America" today. "We're worried about being consistent. We aren't comfortable with contradictory thinking."

She grew up in suburban Connecticut, where her father, John Vincent Coulter, was a lawyer, and her mother, Nell, was a homemaker. Both were religious and conservative.

Coulter said she competed to have the floor against two older brothers during heated political discussions at the family dinner table.

"Let me just say, these tales of torture from Guantanamo I think are nothing," she said. "Try growing up with my brother Jimmy."

Coulter added that she also once debated an elementary school librarian on the Vietnam War and even her friends knew she wanted to make her opinions heard.

"One of my summer camp friends, she said, 'No, no, I remember when we were at summer camp, climbing up White Mountain or something, and Ann running up to me and saying Watergate isn't what it is portrayed,'" she said.

After attending University of Michigan Law School, Coulter was in private practice for a short time. She also clerked for an appeals court judge and worked for the Senate Judiciary Committee. She advised Paula Jones in her sexual harassment suit against President Bill Clinton.

Coulter's career took off when she became a legal correspondent for MSNBC in 1996 -- where she was dismissed, then brought back, then dismissed again for her vicious commentary -- and the author of a syndicated column, as well as several controversial conservative books.

Now Coulter has turned herself into an acid-tongued sensation, with a reputation of riling people.

"I'm on TV... [I] don't think I should be thinking specifically, 'Do I want this host to like me?'" Coulter said. "It should be I'm trying to get a message out to the millions of people watching TV. And I don't think people should get upset at what I say. I make some excellent points."

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