Powerball: Some Winners Remain a Mystery

Winners in Missouri have been identified, but who are the others? The chase is on.
4:52 | 11/30/12

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Transcript for Powerball: Some Winners Remain a Mystery
Tonight, a multimillion dollar mystery. While the rest of the country is tearing up their worthless lottery tickets in disappointment, the identity of one of two powerball winners remains illusive. A surveillance video, the only clue. Well, with the jackpot worth over $580 million, that's a lot of reasons to be curious. Abc's david wright brings us america's newest overnight millionaires. Reporter: At a gas station in maryland, a mystery man checks his numbers and then dances a jig. Could it be the powerball shuffle? He says, is this the right numbers? I said, yeah, man, you got them all. Reporter: In a small town in missouri, at the high school where they first fell in love, cindy and mark hill today insisted that huge check won't change their lives all that much. We will still be going down to the corner cafe for breakfast or fish day, I can guarantee you that. We're as common as anybody. We just have a little bit more money. Reporter: Make that a lot more money. And it's probably wishful thinking. Already, their neighbors in this town of 496 people can't help but see them differently. I'm living in a wealthy neighborhood now. Reporter: They all say they're happy for them. Life just got a little bit easier for them. Cindy hill had been laid off from her job two years ago. She was scheduled for a job interview the morning the numbers came out. Good luck. Take a look at tonight's number. First, the number 5. Reporter: Now, she won't have to work another day in her life. Same goes for her husband, mark, who's already quit his job at the local hot dog factory. He says his boss didn't believe him at first. He said, oh, you're kidding. I said, no. About five minutes later, he called back, he said, really? I said, yeah, really. Reporter: Mark plans to hang onto his old beaten up truck but has his eyes on a red camaro. Cindy hill plans to focus on the kids, especially their youngest, jaden. Jaden has always wanted to go to the beach, so, we may go some place where she can put her taupes in the sand. It's christmas time and we want to be home. We just want everything normal. Reporter: What does jaden want for christmas? Pony. Reporter: What little girl doesn't? But now her parents can afford one. Always going to remember that first day, those first hours, the first couple of weeks. So, you know, throw a party. Have a fantastic time. Have your friends over. Have your family over. And just make it really, really fun. Shortly after that, you're going to start building a team. Reporter: A team, as in, an accou account accountant, a been shl adviser and a lawyer, people that can say no when everyone else is calling out for a handout. Seattle financial adviser michael boone specializes in helping the suddenly wealthy. People just come out of the woodwork. I mean, people that you never, ever thought would come around looking for money look for money and it's not just people who know you. It's people who don't know you. Reporter: The hims are enjoying the honeymoon stage. And somewhere in america, another powerball winner is quietly celebrating an equally good fortune. The gas and go store where they sold that second winning ticket -- this is the lucky machine, i guess. This is the one that did it. Reporter: The place is buzzing with speculation. Yeah. I hope it's someone that needs the money, and not some really rich money. Reporter: Why do you think the lottery captivates people so much? Hope. You know, hope, economic times are tough right now. Reporter: I wonder if you'll recognize the winner. I'm hoping I do, because a lot of people tell us that, if we sell them the winner, they're going to, you know, send some money our way. Well -- time to step up, you know? Reporter: Maybe it's that guy at the maryland gas station, who was so excited about he checked his numbers that he drove off and forgot to buy gas. He wanted everybody to look, to check to see if he wasn't seeing things and he wasn't seeing things. It was the right numbers. Reporter: Then again, maybe not. Today, we asked store manager bob to take a look at the maryland video. Doesn't look familiar at all. And I don't recognize this person at all. Reporter: Whoever the arizona winner may be, they may well find that even powerball money can't buy happiness. times more likely to declare bankruptcy than non-lottery winners. People are likely to end up in jail. They have an increased likelihood of dramatically bad things happening. Reporter: Then again, that sort of talk sounds like sour grapes for the rest of us. Even if the chances their lives will be happier is just 50/50, the flip of a coin, it's better odds than the lottery. And these winners will have plenty of coins to flip. I'm david wright for "nightline" in phoenix.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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