The $100 Million Vote: Harry Reid Woos Skeptical Democrats

Forty-eight percent of respondents to an ABC News/Washington Post poll released Tuesday said they were in favor of health care overhaul, with 49 percent opposed.

Fifty-four percent of insured Americans said it will increase their own costs. Among all respondents, 56 percent thought it will raise overall costs, six in 10 thought it could shut down many private insurers and 61 percent opposed covering abortions in federally supported plans.

House Democrats narrowly passed their version of health care legislation Nov. 8. Only one Republican joined in the vote and the minority party was nearly unanimous in its opposition. Even 39 Democrats opposed the bill, which would cost $1.2 trillion in the next 10 years.

Democrats are deeply divided on the issue of abortion. Some voted against the House bill because it contained an amendment by Rep. Bart Stupak, D-Mich., that would not only cut federal funding for abortion-related activities, it would also limit access to abortions for people who would receive federal subsidies and would have to buy insurance through a health insurance exchange.

Some Democratic senators, such as Nelson, have said they want to see a similar proposal in their bill.

But other Democrats are outraged that this health care bill is focusing on abortion.

"What happened is after the Stupak amendment passed, people really realized it was an unprecedented restriction on a woman's right to choose," Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., said on "Top Line" Tuesday. "So now everybody's sort of taking a deep breath and saying, 'You know, we really don't want to stop people from buying full reproductive care with their own private money.' I think he won't have the votes when people explain to ... those members exactly what the Stupak amendment does."

Stupak disagreed, saying he has ample support for the amendment.

"They're not going to take it out," Stupak said Tuesday on Fox News. "If they do, health care will not move forward. As we expand health care and the federal role in the health care, that prohibition should apply."

Another issue that could threaten Democrats' ability to pass a health care bill through the Senate is public option, a government-run insurance plan that would compete with the private sector. Currently, both the House and Senate versions include that option, but the Senate version gives states the chance to opt out of the public option, if they choose.

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