Husband of CNN's Dana Loesch not targeted by leftists on Twitter, evidence suggests

Hains, the user whose account of her argument with Dana Loesch sparked the mix up, connected Yahoo News with several users who say they routinely report misbehaving Twitter users as abusive. "I absolutely do advise people who are harassed by these hateful idiots to use block and report," a man named Charles Johnson  responded in a tweet. There is no hard evidence, however, that such efforts alone can get a legitimate user removed if he or she is not actually being abusive.

Twitter has  about 900 employees and  140 million active users, so like many companies with huge numbers of users they rely on algorithms to detect anomalous behavior. These secret algorithms are incredibly sophisticated in order to prevent people from cheating them, and they're generally very effective. A  recent Berkeley study that deconstructed the algorithm found a fairly low degree of error in the site's detection system for malicious spammers.

Although calls and tweets from Yahoo News to multiple Twitter spokespeople went unanswered, the company is certainly accounting for factors other than pure numbers of people flagging accounts as spam. If that were the case, prominent voices of any political flavor would regularly vanish and reappear. (This Yahoo News reporter's experimental attempt to get himself suspended on Twitter by encouraging followers to report him as abusive was unsuccessful.)

More likely, Chris Loesch triggered a red flag at the Twitter headquarters by responding to well-wishers too zealously after rising to his wife's defense. Dana Loesch posted a screenshot of the warning page her husband received for his first suspension, which states that he was cut off for "sending multiple unsolicited mentions to other users." His rapid-fire retweeting of others in the immediate aftermath of his spat with Daniel Barber could well meet that definition.

Still, several outlets accept the idea that leftist thought police are systematically purging Twitter of conservative voices. The National Review Online  writes that, "in recent days, left-wing users in America have taken to suppressing conservative accounts on Twitter. They have used Twitter's anti-spam measures to shut down conservative voices by flagging their accounts en masse as spam." But it is unlikely that Chris Loesch triggered a conspiracy. He just tweeted too much.

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