The Note: Literally in Denial

The New York Times ' Rick Lyman looks at how U.S. soldiers in Iraq view the election. LINK

Thomas Friedman thinks "we still don't know which man used the debates to overcome his biggest liability." LINK

The Wall Street Journal 's David Wessel writes that Bush and Kerry didn't sufficiently answer the jobs question during the debates.

The New York Times ' ed board argues in favor of raising taxes (headline: "Why Taxes Have To Go Up"), Noting each candidate's tax plan is "inadequate to support its candidate's vision of government." LINK

We can see the Bush ad now: "Kerry's friends at the New York Times are urging him to raise YOUR taxes …"

Al Hunt in the Wall Street Journal blames Bush for increasing partisan tensions and ends his column with an historical, unflattering look at the president's top adviser.

"For financial professionals, the Nov. 2 election presents a quandary: Although the Bush White House has been good for their pocketbooks, some worry that the administration's policies will hurt the economy and markets over the long term and ravage their clients' nest eggs," writes Tom Petruno in his Los Angeles Times look at how the presidential place is playing on Wall Street. LINK

Here's a sneak peak at what's coming your way in Sunday's New York Times Magazine:

James Traub Notes if Kerry is elected president, "he will face an obstacle just down the street that could prove as formidable as Iraq: the United State House of Representatives."

"No one insists more loudly than conservative Republicans that in the aftermath of 9/11 Americans should put aside partisanship and petty self-interest in order to stand together against a common enemy," writes Traub. "It turns out, however, that the spirit of '94 eclipses the spirit of 9/11."

Tomorrow night on "Nightline," Robert Krulwich wears out a little shoe leather — real and virtual — looking at how grassroots campaigning meets high technology, and John Donvan examines the mad mad world of polling!

ABC News Vote 2004: Bush vs. Kerry: money and politics:

"This year's presidential and congressional campaigns will cost a record $3.9 billion, 30% more than the $3 billion spent four years ago, according to the Center for Responsive Politics," the Wall Street Journal 's Nicholas Zamiska writes, Noting that $2.5 billion came from individual donations to candidates and interest groups — up $1 billion since 2000.

The Los Angeles Times also looks at the billion-dollar campaign. LINK

"President Bush's campaign and the Republican National Committee had roughly $108 million in the bank collectively as they entered October, enough to maintain a blizzard of campaign advertisements and an army of workers through the campaign's final days, finance reports show," the New York Times ' Glen Justice reports. LINK

"Senator John Kerry's campaign and the Democratic National Committee that supports him had roughly $79 million on hand on Sept. 30, according to party and campaign officials. "

Remember as you read this next story: money in politics: not necessarily a bad thing.

"This year's presidential and congressional campaigns will cost a record $3.9 billion, 30% more than the $3 billion spent four years ago, according to the Center for Responsive Politics," per an article in today's Wall Street Journal .

Page
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...