Clinton Camp Formally Launches Republicans for Hillary Effort

PHOTO: Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrives at a Democratic party organizing event at the Neighborhood Theater in Charlotte, North Carolina, July 25, 2016.PlayAndrew Harnik/AP
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Hillary Clinton's campaign today announced the formal creation of a group to recruit Republican and independent voters dissatisfied with the GOP nominee, Donald Trump.

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The launch of the group, Together for America, comes after months of scattered efforts by the campaign and its allies to woo anti-Trump Republicans.

The group consists of nearly 50 leaders in business, national security, foreign and economic policy, politics and other arenas, according to a list provided by the campaign. Their goal is to eventually build grass-roots support among conservatives, an aide said.

"Hillary Clinton understands the complex and volatile world we live in, and she has the temperament to be president and commander-in-chief. Donald Trump does not," the group's website says. "That’s why so many Republicans and independents are putting country over party and supporting Hillary for president."

A flood of prominent Republicans in recent weeks announced their support for Clinton over Trump, including former George W. Bush policy adviser Kori Schake, Hewlett Packard Enterprise CEO Meg Whitman and former acting CIA Director Mike Morell. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, an independent, has also announced his backing of the Democratic nominee.

The recruitment effort has been spearheaded by Clinton's campaign chairman, John Podesta. Former Wall Street executive Leslie Dahl has helped with outreach to business leaders.

The Clinton campaign's efforts to recruit GOP voters began after Trump clinched the nomination in May, when it solicited Republicans to say why they couldn't back Trump.

"Are you a Republican who thinks @realDonaldTrump should not become president? Tell us why," the campaign tweeted.

Clinton and her vice presidential nominee, Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, embarked last week on a bus tour about jobs that was, in part, aimed at courting independents and conservative-leaning voters. The running mates targeted counties in Ohio and Pennsylvania that went Republican in past elections.

The Clinton camp this week expanded its battleground state map to include Arizona and Georgia — yet another sign of efforts to cut into Trump's support.

Top officials from Clinton's headquarters in Brooklyn, New York, held calls with state party officials in Arizona and Georgia to discuss making six-figure investments in the two states, according to a source.

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