Mark Cuban’s Unorthodox Vice Presidential Pitch

PHOTO: Mark Cuban, on an episode of "Shark Tank," Dec. 13, 2013.Adam Taylor/ABC
Mark Cuban, on an episode of "Shark Tank," Dec. 13, 2013.

Although business mogul Mark Cuban has said he is open to discussing the vice presidential slot with both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, he’s got a strange way of showing it.

The businessman slammed the presumptive Republican nominee this week not long after saying he would be “wide open” to discussing joining his ticket.

In an interview on 77 WABC’s “Bernie and Sid Radio Show” on Wednesday, the Dallas Mavericks owner attacked Trump’s business ventures and questioned the real estate mogul’s claims he’s worth $10 billion.

“What he’s done well is put his name on big buildings. ... He’s good at that. Now whether or not that makes him a billionaire, I don’t know,” Cuban said. “He’s not transparent enough for us to know that.”

The star of ABC’s "Shark Tank” added, "So when you're putting your name on steaks, and you're putting your name on water, you're putting your name on playing cards, you're putting your name on all this nonsense, right? You're not gonna make big bucks, no matter what. It's not like Trump Steaks were gonna make him $100 million. It's not like it was gonna make him $5 million. I asked him, ‘What the hell are you doing? Are you that desperate for money?’"

To underscore the point, Cuban tweeted a mashup video of Trump singing “Billionaire.”

Cuban has also not held back from criticizing Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.

“There’s a ton of negative,” Cuban said. “Hillary's got no personality whatsoever. And that’s a big part of this -- no charisma whatsoever.”

However, when it came to assessing Clinton’s record, Cuban said she made mistakes but called it the “nature” of the job.

“Yes, Hillary has made horrible mistakes, Benghazi, many horrible mistakes, horrible mistakes with Libya. ... But that's the nature of the job,” Cuban said.

In a recent episode of ESPN Radio's “Capital Games” podcast, Cuban pitched himself as being “different.”

"What makes me a different candidate for vice president is that I'm a geek working in the tech industry. It's important for presidential candidates to be tech savvy, none are right now,” Cuban said.

Cuban, who identifies himself as “fiercely independent,” said he has been in touch with Clinton aides, and despite not reaching out to the Trump campaign, he is willing to be the real estate mogul’s No. 2.

“It’s not really a matter of whether or not I agree with them. It’s a matter about whether or not I can add value and whether or not I can impact any perspective and hopefully have a positive impact on the country,” he said. “I’m not here to tell you that I’m the only person capable of doing this. I’m not. I’m not here to tell you I’m the smartest person capable of doing this. I’m not. But what I am -- what I will say that I am is that I’m willing. And sometimes that’s the big difference.”