Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Photo
  • President Obama Pardons Turkeys Tater and Tot

    President Barack Obama, with his nephews Aaron Robinson and Austin Robinson, after pardoning Tot, one of the national Thanksgiving turkeys, Nov. 23, 2016, in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington.
    Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Photo
  • National Turkey Federation Chairman Jihad Douglas, right, watches as President Barack Obama pardons national Thanksgiving turkey Abe in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Nov. 25, 2015.
    Evan Vucci/AP Photo
  • President Barack Obama, with his daughters, Sasha and Malia, as Malia reaches to pet a turkey named Courage the day before Thanksgiving, at the North Portico of the White House in Washington, Nov. 25, 2009.
    Alex Brandon/AP Photo
  • President George W. Bush invites local schoolchildren to pet Marshmallow, a turkey from Trites Farms in Henning, Minnestoa, at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in the White House complex in Washington, Nov. 22, 2005. The bird was flown to Southern California, where he served as an honorary marshal in Disneyland's annual Thanksgiving Day Parade.
    J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo
  • President Bill Clinton, holding his nephew Tyler, after granting a Thanksgiving pardon to a turkey named Jerry, Nov. 22, 2000, in the Rose Garden of the White House.
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  • White House correspondents jokingly attempt to interview the traditional Thanksgiving turkey in the Rose Garden of the White House Nov. 24, 1998, shortly after it was pardoned by President Clinton.
    Reuters
  • President George H.W. Bush laughs as he is presented a Thanksgiving turkey from the National Turkey Federation in a Rose Garden ceremony at the White House, Nov. 14, 1990.
    Doug Mills/AP Photo
  • The Thanksgiving turkey being presented to President Ronald Reagan at the White House in Washington, Nov. 23, 1987, tries to fly away after being pardoned. Reagan sent the first officially pardoned turkey, Charlie, to safety at a petting zoo.
    National Archives
  • Amy Carter stands with her mother, first lady Rosalynn Carter, as they are presented with the traditional Thanksgiving turkey, Nov. 21, 1978.
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  • President Gerald R. Ford is presented with a Thanksgiving turkey from the National Turkey Federation, Nov. 20, 1975.
    National Archives
  • President Richard Nixon is presented with a Thanksgiving turkey at the White House on Nov. 19, 1969. According to the White House, "Sometime around the Nixon administration, the president began sending the turkey to a petting farm near Washington after holding the traditional receiving ceremony and photo op, although no formal pardon was given."
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  • President Lyndon Johnson is presented with a 40-pound Thanksgiving turkey at the White House, Nov. 16, 1967. Sen. Everett M. Dirksen from Illinois made the presentation for the National Turkey Federation.
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  • President John F. Kennedy is presented with a Thanksgiving turkey outside the White House in Washington, Nov. 19, 1963. Though it was not the first official presidential turkey pardon, Kennedy allowed the bird to live because of its smaller size, reportedly looking down at the bird and saying, "We'll just let this one grow," before sending it back to its farm.
    Abbie Rowe/National Archives
  • President Dwight D. Eisenhower, center, is presented with a 43-pound Kentucky colonel turkey at the White House by the president of the National Turkey Federation, Nov. 17, 1954.
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  • Members of the Poultry and Egg National Board and other industry representatives present President Harry S. Truman with a Thanksgiving turkey outside the White House, Nov. 16, 1949. This was the first time a turkey was presented to the president, and there is no record of his pardoning the bird. The first turkey was pardoned by Ronald Reagan in 1987.
    Abbie Rowe/U.S. National Parks Service/National Archives
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