Gibbs: Obama Win Will Signal Time for Bipartisan Fiscal Plan

Fmr. Press Secretary Robert Gibbs discusses President Obama's tax plan, tight presidential election.
3:00 | 11/06/12

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Transcript for Gibbs: Obama Win Will Signal Time for Bipartisan Fiscal Plan
Let's two Robert -- in Chicago he's -- -- -- team Obama. At the headquarters in Chicago I believe. You have. A smile on your face Sarah are you viewing this night is. Is doing well. Look did so far so good that's what I would say. I think every path that we had to 270 electoral votes. Is still wide open for us so look it's early and we're going to be here for a while but. If you look at where the early vote Natalie came in in terms of margin but we're came from -- a lot of key states like Ohio and Florida. And we feel pretty good about where we are we -- actually. To be honestly pretty good for the last several days I think the race has been very very stable with the president leading and so far so good. Ever. How much. Do you think -- the the issue of the hurricane and the president's response to that. Has to do with the success that he's having. In so many of these states we have a say don't have a popular vote -- but in terms of the State's it has been able to pick up yet. I think this is you've seen in a number of polls people viewed the president's response to the hurricane appropriately as it. Very positive. But I an Italian. We have not seen in any of our state polling. A change in our state numbers. Base at all on the hurricane I think the notion that the hurricane significantly altered it significantly altered the coast of the eastern seaboard it did not significantly Alter in any way the trajectory of the contours of this race. Robert and -- Mueller about the the house races why weren't Democrats. Able to pick up more seats -- what what went wrong there we had we did. Talk about the Ryan budget we have. Congress incredibly unpopular why weren't while Democrats over the capitalize more on that. Well look I think we're gonna look -- sitting in Chicago and I know we're gonna pick up some seats here in Illinois wonderful patriot in Tammy Baldwin. Not Tammy Baldwin. But what can't get our work this sort of got. I've got sent -- on the brain and -- a wonderful veteran and Tammy Duckworth. Who's gonna pick up a seat here -- look at how will say this that you know one of the things we -- about a house seats particularly after we do reapportionment. Is a lot of these seats yet. Either more democratic or more Republican -- a whole lot more safe seats that are quite frankly no longer in in play and we've had wave elections. You know six in -- -- for Democrats in 2010 for Republicans they quite frankly. Marginal seats. Are now no longer margins so I think if you look -- at. The senate races in some of those swing states where -- having races some of the other states you've seen a lot of healthy democratic. Wins I think we're we're buoyed -- that heartless as. Let's just. Stipulate for the moment that your guy wins tonight wins reelection. He's and most like you'll jinx it I don't seeks -- -- jinx me. I've got a taste good and I'm with you what happens -- -- -- -- -- out of it -- so he's if he wins he's up against what looks at me most likely a divided congress yet again and this is a country -- -- big big problems let's start -- problem number one it is closed on January 1. If he's reelected he'll be reelected with a smaller margin -- his initial election most likely what kind of -- -- have. And what the atmosphere what will be opportunities be like for progress and any sort in the atmosphere in Washington that we expect it to. -- -- -- -- I think you'll have a significant mandate particularly on the notion. He sensible plan to get our fiscal house in order what I mean by that is you know months ago even Democrats thought. Is the president can actually run a campaign where one of the prominent messages is. Raising taxes on those that make above 250000. Dollars raising taxes on the wealthy. To bring to do something to bring our budget into balance and again. I don't mean doing it all of -- raising taxes nobody suggesting they haven't people that's a crazy message to -- a national campaign. We've had that argument virtually every day of this race. For two years. And the president if he wins will have survived the notion of suggesting we raise taxes on. The very wealthy I think that gives him a strong mandate to -- to Republicans. You know what we have to do several things to get our fiscal house in order. We have to deal with spending but we also have to deal with the revenue and I think if you're a Republican and you don't understand. That if the president wins based on that message. That that isn't a signal that the American people are ready for compromise that includes both spending and revenues then you're just not paying attention to the outcome of the. Although we did hear speaker Boehner just -- -- ago saying absolutely no way no how will we see any tax increases. On anyone making at least a million dollars so are -- the marker -- set down before the votes even cast. Why do you think -- think the the president called -- popping the boil if he wins this election on. On on Washington popping that I guess it's kind of gross idea but mr. -- -- But the most. Let it but honestly if you have the speaker of the house right now saying. No way no how we had Tim Phillips on for Americans for prosperity saying they're going to be logging their members of congress to say no way no how to tax increases. The president actually do. Well well there's a lot of things that the president has leverage on quite frankly in coming up. Through this battle look I don't want to get ahead of the white house on the legislative battle on this. But understand that. I think what speaker Boehner was doing was trying to set. Lay down a marker. Not for wary about the negotiations -- the compromise might be. But he laid down a marker for -- very very very hard right wing of his Republican House caucus. In trying to tell them you know we're gonna be tough we're gonna be strong but let -- you begin you cannot look at the results of this race the president wins. And saying that we've not had a significant debate every single day John haters out there saying. This president wants a raise taxes on rich people and if this president gets elected saying we ought to raise taxes on the wealthy in this economy. And it's you know that survives a national referendum if you will it is hard to imagine -- speaker Boehner can look at that results saying see I told you so we shouldn't do it. I also will say this you know I was in the White House for a little more than two years. Republicans. Every single opportunity. Simply said no when ever the president proposed something. Even if it was something they previously supported. I think what the president was talking about in terms of breaking -- fever -- use fever is a better sort of metaphor for. Breaking that partisan fever is this understanding that. We cannot continue to govern this country where one side simply says -- everything that somebody else proposes. It is time to get a big table. It is time to get the seeds around that big table and it is time to begin to discuss all of the issues that because Republicans and simply said no no no on. We kick the can down the road whether it's fiscal responsibility. Whether it's immigration reform whether it's energy. Her education reform a whole host of issues the Republicans -- simply decided. Not to participate in the governing of this country. -- changes at the end of tonight. Robert -- thank you very much wherever care.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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