Why NYC's Top Crisis Manager Says the NYPD Has Changed

In an exclusive interview with ABC News, Anthony Shorris, the first deputy mayor, said the NYPD is different this time around.
2:46 | 07/24/14

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Transcript for Why NYC's Top Crisis Manager Says the NYPD Has Changed
Over the last six months the administration's this administration is entirely change the nature of police community relations. In the only change in the stop and frisk program and ending of that program -- -- we direction to a much more -- unlawful approach to police community engagement. He continued that the settlement of some major cases that have been outstanding for years -- under -- five case and others. And it's been building about building bridges between police and communities -- -- work. I think part of the reason you've seen their reaction to this particular tragedy. Is different than it's been some other cases is because people in the communities in -- recognize that this mayor this administration this police commissioner. Have a very different point of view about how police and community need to engage. The fabric of that relationship is critical not only to justice in communities but also actually -- effective policing. And so a lot of the efforts have been going on have been to strengthen and build on -- attack and that's part of the reason why the reaction to this particular tragedy I think he's been there. Look this is a tragedy and there's no question -- what happened here -- here was something was troubling to everybody. And watching video -- concern violent -- off course. What we need to do is to honor -- memory and to honor that memory there's two things we need to do we need to understand what happens here. And to do -- whole series of investigations have been launched in virtually every level the government. And the district attorney's investigation has begun. The police department's internal affairs and he has begun their conversations with the federal government about what will be federal review -- that police commissioners initiated. And the civilian complaint review board inspector general -- -- look at this to me to understand what happens that's part of what we have to do. And in the second thing we have to do some nations to happen. And that is the most significant action contain its part of the reason police commissioner yesterday. Ordered the review all of the training that goes on police department for -- 35000 officers tie. Top to bottom reassessment of our training our officers when it comes to. In her actions of individuals who work. Part of that. Engaged in something replaces -- suspect package and some kind of activity. That kind of comprehensive and training and that's something we want to do not just here in New York we want to engage experts from. Los Angeles other jurisdictions around the country and the world to make sure that New York which is already has one of the finest police departments anywhere. Has officers were the best trained best equipped. To engage in the kind of community policing that we believe this -- so. In the end I think that's what we have to. Understand what happened and make sure would -- never happens again.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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