Some Voters Bristle at Donald Trump's Plan to Ban Muslims From Entering United States

PHOTO: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop, Nov. 21, 2015, in Birmingham, Ala. PlayEric Schultz/AP Photo
WATCH Iowans Respond to Trump's Plan to Ban Muslims

On Tuesday, as Donald Trump defended his highly controversial call for “a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States,” citizens that fall outside of the Republican front-runner’s sphere of support expressed disgust, even horror at his comments.

“Just uncouth and completely thoughtless and violent itself, I thought,” said William Whate, of Newton, Iowa, when asked about Trump’s plan, a strategy unveiled on Monday in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, by the real estate mogul.

"There were thousands of people outside that couldn't get in, and, frankly, it was a standing ovation that wouldn't stop,” Trump said in an interview on “Good Morning America” about the crowd’s reaction.

The presidential candidate said that those who turned out to see him “just want to see something happen” and interviews with a handful of Trump supporters over the past 24-hours appearing to back up the claim. Across the country in another early nominating state -- New Hampshire -- Jack, a local Manchester bartender, thought a Hitler comparison was more apt when referring to Trump.

“He’s on his way to develop the perfect race ... or religion,” he said.

Trump still leads in national and many state polls (including a CNN/WMUR poll of New Hampshire Republican voters released on Tuesday) and his supporters generally remain fiercely loyal. But, his most recent comments seem to be giving even a few Trump enthusiasts pause.

“That made me a little unsure. I don’t want to agree with it,” said Micah Aurand, also of Newton. “If you ban one religion, then pretty soon you’re gonna be ok with banning all the religions.”

Jason Cole, a Republican lawyer in Manchester, bristled at Trump’s status as his party’s front-runner.

“It’s un-Republican, it’s un-American, and it’s wrong,” he said of Trump’s comments.

And even some of the staunchest GOP voters say that they are fed up.

“I’m in the camp that thinks Hillary is the Antichrist, but if he becomes the nominee,” another Manchester lawyer said referring to Trump, “I’m going to have to go with her.”

Among Democrats, condemnation was not surprisingly even more widespread. Voters in Baltimore shouted in the streets to Bernie Sanders, who was campaigning there on Tuesday, imploring him to “Beat Trump!” as a prominent Baltimore pastor, Jamal Bryant, weighed in.

"The Statue of Liberty says, ‘Come bring me those of you who are tired.’ He is saying, ‘Stop, don’t come,’ which is anti-American and dangerous,” Bryant said.

New Hampshire Democrats Phyllis and Robert Hanavan heard from another Republican candidate on Tuesday, Jeb Bush. The former Florida governor has called Donald Trump “unhinged” and suggested that Trump’s views play into the hands of ISIS.

They both heard Bush speak before the AARP and they count him as a serious contender. What do they think of Trump?

"I guess I have to say the word ‘dangerous,’” Phyllis Hanavan said in an interview. "I do not view him as someone who could work with leaders of other countries and lead us in a safe manner, I think he would put us in peril."