'This Week' Transcript: Former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley

PHOTO: Former Maryland Gov. Martin OMalley speaks during an event to announce that he is entering the Democratic presidential race, on Saturday, May 30, 2015, in Baltimore, as his wife Katie, right, looks on. PlayEvan Vucci/AP Photo
WATCH Gov. Martin O'Malley Says 'New Leadership' Needed to Rein in Wall Street

This is a rush transcript and may contain errors. It will be updated.

(MUSIC PLAYING)

ANNOUNCER (voice-over): Starting right now on ABC THIS WEEK, breaking news: Secretary of State John Kerry hospitalized after an accident overseas. The very latest on his condition.

Also breaking overnight: remembering Beau Biden, the vice president's son, loses his battle with cancer. The tributes pouring in this morning.

Then candidate close-up: Martin O'Malley announces. Does he hold the secret to beating Hillary?

Ben Carson: why a big-time outsider could be a real contender.

And Bobby Jindal: is he about to jump in?

We have Carson, Jindal and an exclusive with Martin O'Malley.

Plus Hastert hush money? That stunning federal indictment against the former House Speaker. What was he really trying to hide?

From ABC News, THIS WEEK with George Stephanopoulos begins now.

(MUSIC PLAYING)

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS, ABC HOST: So much to get to this morning and we'll begin with that breaking news from Europe, where Secretary of State John Kerry has been hospitalized after a biking accident in France. The State Department just announced that he's calling off his diplomatic mission and ABC's Hamish McDonald has all the latest from London.

Good morning, Hamish.

HAMISH MCDONALD, ABC NEWS CORRESPONDENT: Yes, good morning, George. The State Department in fact just releasing that information that secretary of state has in fact broken his leg. It's a fracture to the right femur. He's now traveling directly back to Boston for treatment. Doctors are concerned because this injury is very close to previous hip surgery he's had; the same doctors are going to work on this.

Now the accident happened while Secretary Kerry was biking through the French Alps outside of a town called Scionzier. It's near the Swiss border. He was there as part of a four-country tour.

Now we're hearing from the State Department that doctors and paramedics were on the scene immediately. They were there as part of his motorcade. He was then flown to Geneva University Hospital.

Of course we know that Secretary Kerry is an avid cyclist. We've seen him out in his Lycra on the bike, around Lake Geneva during all of those Iranian nuclear negotiations. His plan was to travel on to Spain later today for meetings, then to France. But for now, not surprisingly, those travel plans have been canceled -- George.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Not surprising. OK, Hamish, thanks very much. We hope he gets back soon.

And now to that sad news we learned overnight that the vice president's son, Beau Biden, has died after a two-year struggle with brain cancer at the age of 46.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

STEPHANOPOULOS (voice-over): The vice president's family released this statement overnight.

"The entire Biden family is saddened beyond words. Beau Biden was, quite simply, the finest man any of us have ever known."

President Obama and the first lady also sharing their grief.

"Michelle and I humbly pray for the good Lord to watch over Beau Biden, and to protect & comfort his family here on Earth."

He was born Joseph Biden III, an Iraq War veteran, awarded the Bronze Star. After serving as Delaware's attorney general, Beau was planning a run for governor next year. He introduced his father at the last two Democratic conventions.

BEAU BIDEN, SON OF JOE BIDEN: He's the father I've always known, the grandfather my children love and adore and the vice president our nation needs. So to my father, my hero, Joe Biden.

STEPHANOPOULOS (voice-over): The Biden family has known so much tragedy. Beau's mother and sister killed in a car accident in 1972. Beau and his brother, Hunter, survived. Joe Biden's sworn in for his first term as senator just days later. At the 4-year-old's hospital bedside.

Out of that loss, a remarkable bond between father and son.

JOE BIDEN, VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: The incredible bond I have with my children is a gift I'm not sure I would have had had I not been through what I went through.

STEPHANOPOULOS (voice-over): And now, as the tributes for Beau flow in, that father's heart broken, the bond eternal.

JOE BIDEN: A father knows he's a success when he turns and looks at his son or daughter and know that they turned out better than he did.

I am a success. I am a hell of a success.

(APPLAUSE)

JOE BIDEN: Beauy, I love you. I'm so proud of you.

STEPHANOPOULOS: -- the vice president and the whole Biden family this morning.

We're going to switch gears now to that dramatic showdown over the PATRIOT Act, playing out this afternoon in emergency session of the Senate, where Rand Paul has vowed to block any effort to extend the National Security Agency's controversial collection of American phone records. That program will end at midnight if the Senate doesn't act, trying this warning from President Obama.

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: And heaven forbid, we've got a problem where we could have prevented a terrorist attack but we didn’t do so simply because of inaction in the Senate.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Let's bring in Richard Clark now, counterterrorism adviser to three presidents.

Richard, thanks for joining us this morning. We just heard that warning from President Obama.

But you actually served on President Obama's panel that reviewed the NSA surveillance program, essentially concluded that it wasn't necessary.

So is the president being a bit alarmist here?

What's really at stake?

RICHARD CLARK, COUNTERTERRORISM EXPERT: No. What the president is saying is he's willing to give up this telephony metadata program, where every call to and from information is recorded and kept by the government. He's willing to give that up because we found it did little or no value, had little or no value.

But if the bill expires altogether, the PATRIOT Act expires altogether, there are other investigative tools -- the lone wolf authority, for example; the roving wiretap authority -- that will go away as well. And that's probably going to happen tonight --

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: And how serious would that be?

CLARK: Well, it depends on how long it goes on. What I think will happen tonight is the law will expire and then later in the week the USA Freedom Act, which is essentially the same as the PATRIOT Act with the exception of the telephony metadata program, that act will pass and most of the authorities will be restored.

So we're likely to be faced with only a few days where the FBI won't have a handful of tools that, frankly, they don't often use.

STEPHANOPOULOS: They don't use them that often.

What does it mean when you have this window that now the whole world knows the window is likely to be there for three days?

CLARK: Well, probably not much because the FBI does have other authorities. They can go to the intelligence court and get a warrant if they have probable cause. They can go to any U.S. court and get a search warrant under the criminal authorities.

So it probably is not as big a deal as the president is making out. But on the other hand, the PATRIOT Act authority, which is going to expire on the telephony metadata program is certainly not as big a deal as Senator McConnell is making it.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Right. And it is likely to get worked out, we think, in the next few days. Of course you know you can never predict Congress with any certainty.

I should also take the opportunity to congratulate you on your new book, "Pinnacle Event," putting all your experience to work into a great beach-reading thriller that had a lot of relevance in 2016 election. Look forward to reading it. Thanks, Richard, for joining us.

CLARK: Thanks, George.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And we're going to turn now to that stunning indictment of former House Speaker Dennis Hastert, the man who came to Washington with a squeaky clean image, a mission to clean up Congress, now facing the prospect of jail time. And this morning we have new information on the hush money scandal pursued by the FBI.

ABC's Jim Avila has that story.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

JIM AVILA, ABC NEWS CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): He came from practically nowhere, a high school teacher and wrestling coach from a small rural district outside Chicago to become the most powerful man in Congress. When he resigned, he seemed to disappear again. But then emerging this week in scandal.

Former Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert, accused of bank fraud and lying to the FBI, a long-time friend says the Illinois Republican is baffled.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There's no question he's been blackmailed. And I hope there becomes exposed and he's vindicated.

AVILA (voice-over): Sources tell ABC News Hastert reportedly agreed to pay $3.5 million as hush money to a former student he allegedly sexually abused sometime during his 16-year tenure at Yorkville High School in Illinois.

And sources say there is a second person who was allegedly victimized in a similar way by Hastert when he was a student. He did not ask for any hush money.

But one of Hastert's former wrestling stars tells ABC News that's not the person he knew.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I stand behind him 100 percent, 110 percent, 200 percent. I'd be in his back pocket in Washington until the end.

AVILA (voice-over): Hastert attracted federal suspicion three years ago after making 15 separate withdrawals of $50,000 from his bank. When questioned, authorities say he started taking out smaller amounts, more than 100 withdrawals of just under the reporting limit of $10,000.

Hastert told the FBI he kept the cash because he didn't think the banking system was safe. Prosecutors allege that was a lie.

This week, the longest serving Republican speaker in the history of the House, Denny Hastert, is expected to be arraigned.

For THIS WEEK, Jim Avila, ABC News, Washington.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

STEPHANOPOULOS: Thanks to Jim for that. Let's bring in our ABC News legal analyst Dan Abrams. So Dan, the FBI gets alerted to these withdrawals from Dennis Hastert's bank account. Walk us through how they decide to take a case like this.

DAN ABRAMS, ABC NEWS LEGAL ANALYST: Well, look, they want to know what's going on. They want to know is there money laundering, is this connected to terrorism...

STEPHANOPOULOS: The bank tells them these withdrawals are happening.

ABRAMS: Right, so the bank gives them the heads up. And then the potential crime is when he changes his behavior. So, it's not a crime to take out large sums of money, it is a crime to then structure your withdrawals to try not to trigger this...

STEPHANOPOULOS: So, if Denny had just a check, no problem.

ABRAMS: Checks are OK, wire transfers are OK, because there's more accountability there. This crime is targeted at accountability, to make sure that people can't take out enormous sums of money, large sums of money, without knowing anything about where it's going.

STEPHANOPOULOS: So, the FBI comes to Dennis Hastert, says, hey, look at all these withdrawals, what are his options when they come to him?

ABRAMS: Well, either he can come clean and he can say I'm being extorted. Here's what happened. He obviously didn't want to talk about that.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Kind of David Letterman did.

ABRAMS: Yeah, except in this particular case, he didn't want to admit it. He wanted to keep it quiet.

He could have said nothing. He could have hired a lawyer and said -- and this would have been the best thing legally for him to have done -- is to have said nothing. Or he could do what he's accused of doing, which is lying in this context.

But let's remember, these crimes that we're talking about -- lying to the FBI, and this structuring financial crime, are not crimes that are typically charged without more. Usually you charge these crimes because you're trying to bring someone down for something larger.

STEPHANOPOULOS: So, is this a form of a kind of like celebrity prosecution?

ABRAMS: I think this is a gotcha prosecution. I don't think if he was Dennis Higgins as opposed to Dennis Hastert they would have charged him here, because once you investigate, once you realize that this isn't about drugs, this isn't about terrorism, this isn't about money laundering, they typically drop these. That's why you have to wonder, does the underlying allegations of misconduct on his part weigh in to the prosecutor's decisions. It shouldn't.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And you think it must, though?

ABRAMS: It shouldn't as a legal matter, but it is hard to understand why you'd charge in this case, absent the fact that he's an incredibly famous, formerly powerful individual, and be the underlying misconduct, neither of which the federal authorities should be taking into consideratin.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And what are the chances that you'll actually see some kind of a prosecution for extortion of Individual A?

ABRAMS: You know, that's the big question. And this is one of those difficult choices prosecutors have to make.

We don't know if he's going to be charged in connection with this case. I'd expect the result here would be that Hastert would plea, because even though these are charges that typically you wouldn't see against someone else, it's going to be very hard for him to defend against. I mean, he's probably guilty of the crimes, but that doesn't mean that he would have been charged if he was someone else.

STEPHANOPOULOS: So, if he pleads can he avoid jail time?

ABRAMS: Very possibly, yeah.

STEPHANOPOULOS: OK. Dan Abrams, thanks very much.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: And we're back now with the roundtable. Going to get their quick pick of the headline of the week. Want to start with Kristen Soltis Anderson, Republican strategist and pollster, head of Echelon Insights. What's your headline of the week?

KRISTEN SOLTIS ANDERSON, GOP STRATEGIST: Soccer's governing board across the world, FIFA, found themselves in a lot of hot water this week with many arrests, but there was also a link to the 2016 campaigns. Yet another round of headlines about the Clinton Foundation taking foreign money, this time from both FIFA and the committee responsible for Qatar's bid for the World Cup.

STEPHANOPOULOS: You think that's going to play?

ANDERSON: I think it's the continuation of just another headline. It seems like every big story that pops up, there is some kind of connection back to Hillary Clinton and her money, and the question is when will the message be about something besides how the Clintons make their money.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Michael Eric Dyson, Georgetown professor, MSNBC analyst. Also have a new book coming out called "The Black Presidency." Your headline of the week.

MICHAEL ERIC DYSON, GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY: The Cleveland Police Department has accepted tough enforcement on the use of force there in Cleveland. As you know, that city, along with Baltimore and along with many others, have been ravaged by an outbreak of unarmed, usually black people being assaulted or killed by the police. And in your interview with Martin O'Malley of course there in Baltimore, he defends his record, but the reality is that that kind of over-policing, or at least the inclination to be suspicious of so many African-American and poor people has led to what is essentially a form of terror for so many occupants of these major cities.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And that issue could play in the presidential race as well. Let me go to our Bloomberg political team, Mark Halperin.

MARK HALPERIN, BLOOMBERG POLITICS: Lots of political news right now. The biggest political story of the year I think is almost certainly going to be the determination of the Republican nominee. This week, a tale of two polls. A Quinnipiac poll shows five Republicans at 10 percent each nationally.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Including one of our guests coming up, Ben Carson.

HALPERIN: That's right. National numbers are interesting, but really what it highlights is it's a state by state race. And to me, our poll out today, Bloomberg Politics "Des Moines Register" poll, Scott Walker with a big lead in Iowa. No one is really a front-runner in New Hampshire. No one is really a front-runner in South Carolina. Scott Walker now is the man to beat, person to beat, in Iowa, and that is going to be a big thing. Can other candidates find states that they can claim to be their best chance to win a state?

STEPHANOPOULOS: John Heilemann.

JOHN HEILEMANN, BLOOMBERG POLITICS: Sticking with presidential politics. On the Republican side, actually trying to write an actual headline, which is everybody hates Rand Paul, and he loves it. Which is this week, where he's had - Rand Paul with his book coming out, getting into a lot of controversies on the Republican side by saying that the creation of ISIS, the Republican policies had something to do with that. Also obviously the NSA debate. He's now been criticized by everybody else in the field. They are all attacking him as either naive, not ready to be commander in chief, not strong enough on national security. It's really important for Rand Paul, but it also highlights the larger debate that's going to run throughout the Republican nomination fight over where the party is going on foreign policy, national security.

STEPHANOPOULOS: He's on the Senate floor today. We're going to talk about that later. We're just getting started right now. Ben Carson, Bobby Jindal up next, but first, our powerhouse puzzler, inspired by this week's Scripps National Spelling Bee. For the second year in a row, it was a tie, after one of the co-champs spelled Nunatak. We'll be right back with the answer, see if you guys can get it.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: OK, testing the round table. How do you spell the word “nunatak”, Mark Halperin?

“I got a D in spelling.” So he gives up. John Heilemann?

HEILEMANN: None of your business.

(LAUGHTER)

ANDERSON: I tried to add a lot of what I figured were silent vowels.

STEPHANOPOULOS: (INAUDIBLE) nunataks up in Cape Cod.

(LAUGHTER)

DYSON: That’s either A or U.

STEPHANOPOULOS: You got it right1

HALPERIN: No, he didn’t! He blamed -- he hedged.

(LAUGHTER)

DYSON: Oh, that’s all right.

(CROSSTALK)

DYSON: I did win the sixth grade spelling bee at Wayne (ph) Elementary.

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: Coming right up, we’re up close with two Republican contenders, Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal, grassroots star Dr. Ben Carson, now at the top of the GOP pack.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(At rally) O'MALLEY: I declare I'm a candidate for president of the United States!

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: Why you? Why now?

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: Because I believe our country's facing some very deep challenges. And I believe that we're not going to overcome our problems without new leadership. So what I offer in this race, George, is 15 years of executive experience accomplishing difficult things and bringin' people together to get them done. And the most difficult challenge we face right now is restoring the truth of the American dream that we share, making wages go up, and making our country work again and our economy work for all of our people.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: We've had Democratic presidents 16 of the last 24 years. How would a Martin O'Malley presidency be different from Bill Clinton's, different from Barack Obama's?

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: Because of President Obama's choices, we were able to avoid a second Great Depression. But-- work remains when 70% of us are earning the same or less than we were 12 years ago. So I guess I differ, I would say, from President Obama in my background and-- and my experience. His was that of a legislator. Mine was of a big city, and also facing difficult challenges, and also of a state-- that we had to lead through the recession. And that's-- that's a big difference with his experience.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: Also, it could be a double-edged sword. You know, everyone's been focused on the issues in Baltimore coming out of the un-- recent un-- unrest. And you were mayor of Baltimore for eight years. Big drop in crime. But a lot of your critics say your tenure also sowed the seeds of distrust between the police and the community. I was struck by something the former he-- head of the Baltimore N.A.A.C.P. told the Baltimore Sun- He said, "Martin O'Malley's going around Baltimore as his claim to fame. I think this should be his greatest s-- embarrassment."

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: To-- it's-- interesting, isn't it? For all of the progress that we make, there's always so much more that needs to be done. I would not have been elected with 91% of the vote first time or reelected four years later with 88% of the vote if we were not making substantial progress. When I was elected in 1999, George, our city had become the most violent, and addicted, and abandoned city in America. It was a huge challenge. But we went on in the next ten years to achieve the biggest reduction of part one crime of any city in America. And now, the city's population is growing again with greater numbers of young people moving back here than before. But it's also true that we have huge pockets of poverty in our city and in other cities in the United States. And the anger-- that erupted in our city-- happened in some of the poorest, hardest hit neighborhoods where unemployment's actually higher now than it was seven years ago. I'd be angry to. The poet once wrote that the unemployment in our bones erupts in our hands and stones. We can do better as a country. And we can't leave behind so many that are underemployed, or unemployed, or earning less than they were 12 years ago.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: In your speech today-- you had some tough words for-- Jeb Bush and Hillary Clinton.

O'MALLEY SPEECH - the CEO of Goldman Sachs let his employees know that he'd be just fine with either Bush or Clinton. I bet he would... I've got news for the bullies of Wall Street -- The presidency is not a crown to be passed back and forth by you between two royal families.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: Are you saying that both Bush and Clinton are beholden to the bullies of Wall Street?

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: I'm saying that what we need new leadership to accomplish is to actually rein in excesses-- on Wall Street. And when you have somebody that's the CEO of one of the biggest repeat-- offending investment banks in the country telling his employees that he'd be fine with either Bush or Clinton, that should tell all of us something.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: You don't see a difference?

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: Do I see a difference? Sure, I see many differences. But one of the most important differences when it comes to reining in Wall Street is who's on our side. I have the independence. I have the track record.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: You think—

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: Government’s for—

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: --Hillary Clinton and Jeb Bush would have the same approach to Wall Street?

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: I don't know what Secretary Clinton's-- approach to Wall Street might be. She will run her own campaign and I will run mine. I can tell you this. I am not beholden to Wall Street interests. There are not Wall Street CEOs banging down my door and trying to participate or help my campaign.

ONE MORE DIFFERENCE - THE PRESIDENT'S CONTROVERSIAL PACIFIC TRADE AGREEMENT - OMALLEY'S STAKED HIS CLAIM - CLINTON HAS YET TO WEIGH IN

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: You think she's gonna be for it?

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: Well, she's been awfully silent, but I'm sure she'll come out with a position in her own-- in her own time. I have not been silent. I'm opposed to it. We shouldn't be in a race to the bottom for the cheapest labor in the world. That diminishes us as a people and it hurts our economy.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: Secretary Clinton also facing questions about her email account, about the foundation. Is that something voters should be worried about?

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: She's-- she's capable of defending herself. She has had a-- a very-- noteworthy-- career of public service and service to our country. So-- I think we should focus on the ideas.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: President Obama had some fun at your expense at the White House Correspondents' Dinner.

OBAMA JOKE: Not to be outdone, Martin O'Malley kicked things off by going completely unrecognized at a Martin O'Malley campaign event (laughter)

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: I was there. (LAUGHTER)

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: Well, you know, it's-- w-- I don't know what your reaction to the joke was, but he's hitting on a real problem. You're about 1%-- in-- in-- in the polls right now—

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: I've been there before.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: Sketch out a path of victory.

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: The-- look, I think-- the presidential primary processes and the caucuses in Iowa-- have a certain-- have a certain greatness to them. And it is this-- that people there have seen 1% candidates before-- get into the van, go from county to county to county and make their case about their better choices that they would offer the nation, and suddenly become very well-known overnight when people make up their mind.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: How are you even gonna get into the pole position right now? I mean, Bernie Sanders-- taken out a lotta the same progressive positions you have-- has kind of shot up-- in both the national polls and-- and Iowa and New Hampshire the last-- few weeks. Is-- that's a challenge to your candidacy.

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: Well, I think it's an encouragement to my candidacy, and for this reason. I think that-- the public is looking for new leadership, leadership that doesn't apologize for having progressive values.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: --why should progressive voters pick you over Bernie Sanders?

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: Because I have a track record of actually getting things done, not just talking about things.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: And you're heading to Iowa now?

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: Heading to Iowa now-- and then to New Hampshire.

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: Governor, thanks for coming on.

GOVERNOR O'MALLEY: George, thank you.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: And we're back now with the roundtable. Going to get their quick pick of the headline of the week. Want to start with Kristen Soltis Anderson, Republican strategist and pollster, head of Echelon Insights. What's your headline of the week?

KRISTEN SOLTIS ANDERSON, GOP STRATEGIST: Soccer's governing board across the world, FIFA, found themselves in a lot of hot water this week with many arrests, but there was also a link to the 2016 campaigns. Yet another round of headlines about the Clinton Foundation taking foreign money, this time from both FIFA and the committee responsible for Qatar's bid for the World Cup.

STEPHANOPOULOS: You think that's going to play?

ANDERSON: I think it's the continuation of just another headline. It seems like every big story that pops up, there is some kind of connection back to Hillary Clinton and her money, and the question is when will the message be about something besides how the Clintons make their money.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Michael Eric Dyson, Georgetown professor, MSNBC analyst. Also have a new book coming out called "The Black Presidency." Your headline of the week.

MICHAEL ERIC DYSON, GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY: The Cleveland Police Department has accepted tough enforcement on the use of force there in Cleveland. As you know, that city, along with Baltimore and along with many others, have been ravaged by an outbreak of unarmed, usually black people being assaulted or killed by the police. And in your interview with Martin O'Malley of course there in Baltimore, he defends his record, but the reality is that that kind of over-policing, or at least the inclination to be suspicious of so many African-American and poor people has led to what is essentially a form of terror for so many occupants of these major cities.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And that issue could play in the presidential race as well. Let me go to our Bloomberg political team, Mark Halperin.

MARK HALPERIN, BLOOMBERG POLITICS: Lots of political news right now. The biggest political story of the year I think is almost certainly going to be the determination of the Republican nominee. This week, a tale of two polls. A Quinnipiac poll shows five Republicans at 10 percent each nationally.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Including one of our guests coming up, Ben Carson.

HALPERIN: That's right. National numbers are interesting, but really what it highlights is it's a state by state race. And to me, our poll out today, Bloomberg Politics "Des Moines Register" poll, Scott Walker with a big lead in Iowa. No one is really a front-runner in New Hampshire. No one is really a front-runner in South Carolina. Scott Walker now is the man to beat, person to beat, in Iowa, and that is going to be a big thing. Can other candidates find states that they can claim to be their best chance to win a state?

STEPHANOPOULOS: John Heilemann.

JOHN HEILEMANN, BLOOMBERG POLITICS: Sticking with presidential politics. On the Republican side, actually trying to write an actual headline, which is everybody hates Rand Paul, and he loves it. Which is this week, where he's had - Rand Paul with his book coming out, getting into a lot of controversies on the Republican side by saying that the creation of ISIS, the Republican policies had something to do with that. Also obviously the NSA debate. He's now been criticized by everybody else in the field. They are all attacking him as either naive, not ready to be commander in chief, not strong enough on national security. It's really important for Rand Paul, but it also highlights the larger debate that's going to run throughout the Republican nomination fight over where the party is going on foreign policy, national security.

STEPHANOPOULOS: He's on the Senate floor today. We're going to talk about that later. We're just getting started right now. Ben Carson, Bobby Jindal up next, but first, our powerhouse puzzler, inspired by this week's Scripps National Spelling Bee. For the second year in a row, it was a tie, after one of the co-champs spelled Nunatak. We'll be right back with the answer, see if you guys can get it.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: OK, testing the round table. How do you spell the word “nunatak”, Mark Halperin?

“I got a D in spelling.” So he gives up. John Heilemann?

HEILEMANN: None of your business.

(LAUGHTER)

ANDERSON: I tried to add a lot of what I figured were silent vowels.

STEPHANOPOULOS: (INAUDIBLE) nunataks up in Cape Cod.

(LAUGHTER)

DYSON: That’s either A or U.

STEPHANOPOULOS: You got it right1

HALPERIN: No, he didn’t! He blamed -- he hedged.

(LAUGHTER)

DYSON: Oh, that’s all right.

(CROSSTALK)

DYSON: I did win the sixth grade spelling bee at Wayne (ph) Elementary.

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: Coming right up, we’re up close with two Republican contenders, Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal, grassroots star Dr. Ben Carson, now at the top of the GOP pack.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(MUSIC PLAYING)

STEPHANOPOULOS (voice-over): In THIS WEEK's "Buzz Board," two new candidates for the GOP.

RICK SANTORUM (R), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: I'm ready to do this again.

GEORGE PATAKI, FORMER GOVERNOR OF NEW YORK: I'm a candidate for the Republican nomination --

(APPLAUSE)

PATAKI: -- for President of the United States.

STEPHANOPOULOS (voice-over): And after their announcements, Rick Santorum edges out George Pataki in our Facebook Senti-Meter.

The packed field bunched at the top: Bush, Carson, Huckabee, Rubio and Walker in a five-way tie.

And Rand Paul did his best to break from the pack with this surprising shot at fellow Republicans.

SEN. RAND PAUL (R-KY), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: ISIS exists and grew stronger because of the hawks in our party, who gave arms indiscriminately and most of those arms were snatched up by ISIS.

(MUSIC PLAYING)

STEPHANOPOULOS: And we are joined now by another official candidate, Dr. Ben Carson.

Dr. Carson, thank you for joining us --

BEN CARSON (R), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: It's a pleasure.

STEPHANOPOULOS: -- this morning. What did you make of those comments by Rand Paul, blaming Republicans for the growth of ISIS?

CARSON: That certainly would not be my take on it. I believe that, you know, we kind of stirred things up when we went in there. But when we stirred them up even worse when we left there and left an unstable situation.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Yes, you have said you wouldn’t have gone into Iraq in the first place. So I was wondering if there is a Carson doctrine on when you would use force as president and when you wouldn’t.

What conditions must be met before commander in chief Ben Carson would send American troops into harm's way?

CARSON: Well, clearly it has to be in the interest of America and the American people. And you know, in that particular case, back in 2003, I didn't see that necessarily as being in our interest.

I do, however, see what's going on now as being in our interest because as ISIS is growing and some of the other radical jihadists, their intention is to destroy us and our way of life. And that's a very different situation.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Would you go as far as other Republicans, like Senator Rick Santorum, former senator who told me this week he would put 10,000 troops on the ground?

CARSON: I believe if that was necessary I would not hesitate to do that. But I would do that in consultation with some of our top military people, who, I think, have been, to some degree, disregarded.

STEPHANOPOULOS: You also see Senator Rand Paul taking action today to stop the PATRIOT Act and the bulk collection of Americans' phone records.

Where do you stand on that?

Would you continue the program if you were president?

CARSON: Well, I certainly believe that there is a correlation between some of the steps that have been taken since 9/11 and the fact that we've not had other major insults.

Having said that, I think we really have to protect the Constitution, the Fourth Amendment, and there are aspects of the PATRIOT Act, you know, such as the massive metadata collection, which, I think, probably are not necessary.

You know, the --

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: But you support Rand Paul on this?

CARSON: No. The data is already collected. And I think that's good by the -- by the phone companies. And we have a process whereby a warrant can be gotten if one is suspicious.

STEPHANOPOULOS: OK. And I want to ask you also about this -- your kind of surprise rise in the polls right now. We just showed that poll, the Quinnipiac poll, this week showing you tied for first place nationally. You're also doing quite well in Iowa. Yo also won the straw poll at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference just last week.

So do you consider yourself a front-runner now? And how are you going to build on it?

CARSON: Whether I'm a front-runner or not doesn't matter. What matters is that the people themselves are starting to listen and evaluate for themselves rather than listening to what people say I said and what people say that I meant. And that's a good thing, because this country is really centered around the people. They're supposed to be at the pinnacle. They're not supposed to be manipulated by pundits and various people who tell you this is -- this is the person. This is the one you need to listen to.

And I think that's very encouraging.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And you're starting to believe you can be president?

CARSON: I certainly believe that is a possibility. Obviously that will be left up to the people after they have an opportunity to listen carefully to the plans of everybody involved. And I think we should listen to everybody involved and evaluate for ourselves with our superior intellect who is the person who best represents us.

STEPHANOPOULOS: You're doing something unusual for declared candidate for president continuing to give paid speeches. That could raise some legal questions if the speeches for your campaign in any way.

So how are you going to keep that from happening?

What safeguards are you going to put in place?

And have you considered stopping those paid speeches?

CARSON: Certainly, I was asked by some political people to just cancel those speeches. I only have about four left. And I had hundreds of speeches.

But you know, when people have gone through a lot of trouble getting sponsors and selling tables and what have you, you don't just walk out on them. I think that is horrible.

And you know, when it comes to giving back charitable donations, I would match myself against anybody.

STEPHANOPOULOS: So after -- so after those four speeches, you'll probably stop?

CARSON: I'm -- I haven't accepted any paid speeches for many, many months and I won't be accepting others.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Dr. Carson, thanks very much for joining us this morning.

CARSON: Absolutely.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Another Republican looking hard at the race, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal. He joins us right now.

And, Governor, thank you for joining us.

You heard Ben Carson on Rand Paul. You're even tougher on Senator Paul this week, saying it's impossible to imagine a President Paul defeating radical Islam.

If that's the case, will you refuse to support Rand Paul if he's your party's nominee?

BOBBY JINDAL (R), GOVERNOR OF LOUISIANA: George, thank you for joining me this morning. Look, I don't think it's going to come to that. I don't he will be our party's nominee.

I wasn’t surprised to hear a presidential candidate want to continue the failed foreign policies of President Obama. I was just surprised that it was a Republican. Listen to what he said. He said that ISIS exists because of foreign policy hawks in the Republican Party.

George, that's nonsense. ISIS is evil. ISIS exists because of radical Islam, radical Islam. It's radical Islamic terrorism. Nobody in America is to blame for the existence of ISIS. That is reckless. That is almost bizarre rhetoric coming from somebody who's auditioning to be commander in chief.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And what you do to defeat them right now?

JINDAL: Well, look, right now, we need a -- first of all, we need a commander in chief who's honest with us and tells us the real enemy that we face. We've got a president who, for some reason, doesn’t want to even say the words "radical Islamic terrorism." And we need to identify the enemy. We need to do everything we can to hunt them down and kill them. We need to take the political handcuffs off of our military advisers.

The president, for example, right now has gone to Congress, saying give me the authorization to use military force with a three-year deadline, with a ban on ground troops. That's ridiculous. Let's not tell the enemy what we will or will not do. Let's provide arms to the Kurds. Let's show our allies in the region we're serious about defeating this enemy.

This president with his failed red line with Assad, for example, in Syria, I think, discouraged Sunni allies in the region that want to help us.

If we are serious about getting rid of ISIS, destroying their ability to hold ground in Syria and Iraq, destroying their ability to build the so-called caliphate, one, we stop their ability to recruit. But second, I think we encourage other allies that want to work with us, that want to help us wipe out this enemy.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Rand Paul's team his back pretty hard at you this week, calling you a flip-flopper on Common Core, saying you've cratered your state's economy and budget. You're response?

JINDAL: Well, look, we have cut our budget -- we measure our success by the success of our people, not the success of government. George, we've cut our budget 26 percent, over 30,000 fewer state government employees. Our economy has grown twice as fast as the national economy, three times as fast. Job creation, look, I think the senator is a little sensitive.

The reality is, we've already had a one term senator from the Democratic Party who wanted to retreat from the war, that wanted to project American weakness. We don't need to replace him with a one-term Republican senator that also wants to project that same weakness. All around the world, because we're trying to lead from behind, you see Iran on the march, more influence in Iraq, in Syria and Lebanon. You see Russia on the march, more in eastern Ukraine. You see China on the rise in Asia. This is what happens when America tries to retreat from the world.

We need peace through strength. All that weakness does is provoke our enemies. We're not going to defeat evil through weakness. Unfortunately, Senator Paul doesn't seem to understand that.

STEPHANOPOULOS: I know you said you're going to decide about your own run next month, but I wonder if you're being overtaken by events. The field continues to grow every single day. You just don't seem to be getting any traction. The latest poll out of Iowa, Bloomberg poll, has you tied for 14th. Is it too late?

JINDAL: No. George, a couple of things. On the Republican side, this will be an earned nomination, unlike the Democratic side, this is not a coronation.

I think voters want a big change. I think they want a candidate who is going to go to Washington, they want a president who is going to make not only a Republican president, but somebody who is going to go in there and rescue the American dream from becoming the European nightmare.

President Obama is drowning us in debt, more spending, more government dependence, more regulations, more taxes, that's not the American dream. We need a president who will make big changes -- I'm the only potential candidate that's offered detailed policies. For example, on health care, foreign policy, energy, education.

Every Republican says they want to get rid Obamacare. We're the only one offering detailed ideas about how do you actually do that?

STEPHANOPOULOS: But what do you make when you see someone with no governing experience like Dr. Ben Carson doing so well right now, doing so well in the polls, what does that tell you about what GOP primary voters are looking for?

JINDAL: Well, George, a couple of things, I'm still biased towards governors, especially vis-a-vis senators and others. I think that those that have run something either than the private sector over their states, we are better qualified. We've had now two terms of a president who needed on the job training, we can't afford that again.

But the great thing is that this will ultimately be up to the voters. I think that in this election, at least on the Republican side, they're not going to commit to like. They're going to want to kick the tires. We have had -- I think every politician says this is the most important election of our lifetime, this really is. I think voters want someone who can not just give a good talk, say good one-liner, they want somebody who can actually govern and can make big changes.

George, if we don't shrink the size of the federal government, it's going to overtake our economy. We have done that in Louisiana. We understand that as a government continues to grow, our people in the real world continue to suffer. Their incomes aren't rising, we don't see the real growth rate that we really deserve as a country.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Governor, it sure sounds to me like you're ready to get in. Thank you for joining us this morning.

JINDAL: Thank you, George.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Up next, time for our roundtable to weigh in in a week packed with new candidates for president. We're going to be right back.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

STEPHANPOULOS: Back with the roundtable.

Let's talk about these new candidates, the shape of the field right now. And Mark Halperin from Bloomberg, let me begin with you. You saw Martin O'Malley give a strong speech yesterday, but what is his play here?

HALPERIN: I think both Martin O'Malley and Bernie Sanders have earned already a chance to be part of the debate over the Democratic nomination. They're going up against a formidable frontrunner, but his play is to spend time on the ground in Iowa and New Hampshire, and like Bernie Sanders answer a lot of questions.

Until Secretary Clinton shows that she's willing to engage on the debate, take positions, and talk to Democrats about issues they care about more than she is, I think they will get a big hearing.

STEPHANOPOULOS: She hasn't take a position yet on that trade agreement...

HALPERIN: Or on the pipeline.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And John Heilemann, you know, Mark mentioned Bernie Sanders as well. He does seem to be having quite a hold on Democratic primary voters. He showed at 15 percent in that Quinnipiac Poll, drawing big crowds in New Hampshire. How much of that is a challenge to O'Malley?

HEILEMANN: Well, it's a huge challenge to O'Malley. I mean, Sanders has -- six months ago if you had said would Bernie Sanders become the primary alternative to Hillary Clinton, no one would have thought that was possible. He has incredible degree of authenticity, and he has incredibly strong distinctive economic proposals that are very appealing to the populist far left wing of the party.

O'Malley seemed to be trying to position himself just a step to the left of Clinton. And it's not clear whether there's a lot of room there. If you're a mainstream liberal, you're going to like Hillary Clinton, if you're further to the left, Bernie Sanders is your guy. How does Martin O'Malley find a place on that spectrum.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Chris, and I'm wondering do you think Republicans look at this and are rooting for O'Malley and Sanders, the stronger -- the better they do, the more they push Clinton to the left, or do you think that will make her more vulnerable in the general election?

ANDERSON: I don't think Republicans are terribly worried about the effects that Martin O'Malley will have on at least their chances to take the White House in 2016, whether it's the effect on Clinton or it's the prospect of him being the nominee himself.

I think challenge Martin O'Malley is going to have is he wants to position himself as sort of the acceptable to the establishment alternative to a Bernie Sanders. Bernie Sanders identifies as a socialist. He's very far outside the mainstream. And so to the extent that Martin O'Malley can, I think he is trying to strike that middle ground. The question is, is his record as governor of Maryland or as mayor of Baltimore something that's going to give him a lot to run on?

Remember, right now Maryland is very Democratic state just elected a Republican governor in part because the candidate for the governor's office ran against Martin O'Malley's record.

STEPHANOPOULOS: You see, he's pressing that experience hard in the interview, also talking about being a new generation, giving progressives a choice, Michael Eric Dyson.

DYSON: Yeah, it seems. But I think that if you're the acceptable face of the left, because Bernie Sanders is too much to the left for you and Hillary Clinton is further to the right, especially on foreign policy is her hawkishness, you're in a tough position, because then you've got to figure out, as John said, how to make that sell.

I think that, look, Bernie Sanders is proving there is a little bit of socialism in a lot of people on the left, or at least a lot of people in the Democratic Party.

STEPHANOPOULOS: They just might not admit it.

DYSON: They just won't admit it. They won't come out the closet. So, he's the out candidate for so many people who are still in the closet with their kind of progressive views. I don't think Martin O'Malley strikes that kind of furious response.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Let's talk about the Republicans right now.

John Heilemann, you talked about Rand Paul, loving the fact that everybody is attacking him on foreign policy. But is that coming at a price for Rand Paul? The better he does later on, the more people will look at those positions and say he can't be the Republican Party nominee?

HEILEMANN: Well, look, he is -- the positions that he's advocating are considerably to the left of where the Republican foreign policy establishment is. The open question is where the actual base of the party is. And there is no -- if Rand Paul is going to be successful, it's going to be partly by attracting independents, that's where a lot his strength is. Our Bloomberg politics foreign...

STEPHANOPOULOS: And getting his dad's voters back as well.

HEILEMANN: Yeah, starting with his dad's voters, then appealing to independents. He's in Iowa -- in our poll, he is the strongest one in terms of independent voters that are likely to go to the caucuses. And then tapping into at the base level the more -- I don't want to say isolationist, but more skeptical about foreign entanglements.

That view is out there in the Republican electorate, the question is how big it is.

STEPHANOPOULOS: I want to bring up that Bloomberg poll again, I want to show it on the screen right now. Mark Halperin, you were talking before about how Scott Walker, clear leader right now at 17 percent, Ben Carson hanging in at 10 percent along with Rand Paul. Look at George -- I mean, Jeb Bush, excuse me, down there at 9 percent tied with Mike Huckabee.

And you dig deeper into that poll, he's still got that problem of so many Republicans saying they just don't want to vote for him no matter what.

HALPERIN: Two other problems -- the other problem is favorable/unfavorable; he's got amongst the highest unfavorables in the poll of any Republican. His campaign looks at numbers like this. They saw our poll. And they say this is a static snapshot of where we are today. He wouldn’t win Iowa today. But they’re going to have over $100 million to spend to try to not just raise him up but to take down some of the other Republicans.

The thing I raised earlier, though, I think is important for him. He needs to -- everyone needs to stay to win. This is going to be a long fight, probably; delegates will matter. But those early states will matter, as they always do.

If Scott Walker has with Iowa, what does Jeb Bush have?

STEPHANOPOULOS: That is the question. Kristen Soltis Anderson, you also see Marco Rubio laying a pretty strong claim to South Carolina, trying to play there as well. It really leaves Jeb Bush with New Hampshire. His father and his brother both had some trouble there.

ANDERSON: This is still going to be a very crowded field by the time you get to New Hampshire. I think Mark's absolutely right. You're going to have to put some early points on the board in order to stay in this.

But I think the challenge that Bush has right now is he's got to figure out what his coalition looks like. So take someone like Rand Paul. It's very clear who the Rand Paul voter is. Take someone like Ted Cruz. It's very clear who the Ted Cruz voter is.

I think right now Jeb Bush has still got to come out with what his message is and figure out what that coalition of voters is in order to combat some of the things that you found in the poll, where there is a section of the party that's at this point not as crazy about him.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And one of the other things that I think all the Republicans are banking on, Michael Eric Dyson, as Kristen was talking about earlier, is that Hillary Clinton’s baggage is going to start to weigh her down.

How concerned are Democrats and progressives getting about that?

DYSON: I don't think too terribly concerned. Look, she's been vetted already. All the stuff and guff she's taken over the years, she's got a lot of practice in trying to thrust and parry.

The problem is, she's going to, you know, the question is will she wait too late to be able to weigh in, to leverage all of that authority she's accumulated over the years against some of the charges that keep nagging away.

But she's celebrating the fact that all the Republicans are jumping in. I mean, when you got a guy like Rand Paul, who's a Libertarian in the midst of a field of very conservative figures, he can sound like George Wallace in one beat and like Noam Chomsky on the other. I mean, that kind of diversity adds a kind of a whizz and burr (ph) to the process that at least alleviates some of the concern about Hillary on the Left --

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: -- nagging problems?

HALPERIN: For Hillary Clinton?

Well, there's substantive issues she has to address and her campaign -- I -- you know, this week, I've tried to get answers of -- to some stories that broke about President Clinton's finances. I've never dealt with the campaign in my career that was as unresponsive. They say we'll get you those answers and then simply don't.

For a major campaign that's well staffed, I've never encountered that. And I think that suggests they don't want to answer the questions.

In the short term, most Democratic strategists I talk to say that's the right thing to do, because it's not hurting her poll numbers.

STEPHANOPOULOS: You're nodding your head.

HEILEMANN: Well, they seem -- they are -- if -- they're trying to just power through this. And I -- and but I think there is -- it's coming at some cost. I do think, contrary to what Eric said, or Michael Eric Dyson, just said, is that there is I think growing -- not -- it's not bubbling over, but there's a gnawing sense among a lot of Democrats, especially establishment Democrats, that they are not handling these things well and that the stories keep building on themselves and could potentially be problematic in a general election for her if she doesn’t answer them.

STEPHANOPOULOS: We're going to have to stop there. Thank you all very much.

And coming up, why dozens of billionaires are giving away their fortunes and how it's charging our world after this from our ABC stations.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: For the last five years, some of America's wealthiest families have been leading a new philanthropic movement. It's called The Giving Pledge. Its goal: to channel the billions held by the richest of the rich back to the people who need it most.

ABC's Rebecca Jarvis sat down with pledge founders Warren Buffett and Bill and Melinda Gates to track its progress.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

REBECCA JARVIS, ABC NEWS CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): They are some of the most famous names on the planet, who hang out with rock stars, even presidents.

OBAMA: He's so thrifty I had to give him a White House tie.

(LAUGHTER)

OBAMA: But when Bill Gates came, he wanted one, too.

(LAUGHTER)

JARVIS (voice-over): But for the past five years, these billionaires have focused on a remarkable mission: giving away their massive fortunes to charity.

JARVIS (on camera): You decided to give away 99 percent of your wealth.

WARREN BUFFETT, CHAIRMAN & CEO, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY: The money has great utility to other people. You can buy vaccines. You can buy education. It does me no good. It does them a lot of good and besides, you know, 20 years from now, I will be in a place where there will be no Form 400.

(LAUGHTER)

JARVIS (voice-over): We visited Warren Buffett and Bill and Melinda Gates to talk about the progress of The Giving Pledge and the challenges ahead.

BUFFETT: I've just been amazed that how receptive people have been.

JARVIS (voice-over): What began as 40 billionaires pledging to donate at least half their money has now more than tripled to 135 individuals and families from 14 countries, a total of nearly $1 trillion in commitments from the likes of Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Richard Branson and Spanx creator Sara Blakely.

BUFFETT: These people are giving a very minimum of $500 million.

JARVIS: You're surprised.

BUFFETT: I've gotten a fair number of nos, but I've gotten a lot of yeses. And Bill's gotten even more.

BILL GATES, ENTREPRENEUR: We had no idea we'd get this many people to come together.

JARVIS (voice-over): And tackling issues like poverty, education and disease, where they've seen considerable success.

BILL GATES: Polio is likely to become the second disease ever eradicated and then we'll take that success and go after other diseases, like malaria.

We expect to cut the number of children who die, which is 6 million a year, in half over this next 15 years.

JARVIS: What has the most pressing, urgent need today?

MELINDA GATES, ENTREPRENEUR: How do we empower women and girls; they’re at the center of the family and they're the ones who make the investments in health in their family.

JARVIS (voice-over): Of the world's 1,800 billionaires, 7 percent have signed the pledge, getting more new faces on board, particularly international donors, is a top priority.

JARVIS: I do want to hear the elevator pitch.

What do you say?

BUFFETT: I just say, hi, Rebecca.

(LAUGHTER)

BUFFETT: What are you thinking about doing with all that wealth that you've got? You're not going to live forever and you really think your children will be better off if they each have, you know, $500 million or a $1 billion and they never have to do anything the rest of their lives?

JARVIS (voice-over): The pledge is not a legally binding document and those who take it can give today or put it in their will.

BILL GATES: You can't really say to people give it all away while you're alive because you don't know how long you're going to live. The sooner, the better; we're always encouraging people that it's fun and as Warren likes to say, the younger you are, the more vibrant and clever about your giving you'd like to be --

(CROSSTALK)

BILL GATES: -- yes, he's got a more colorful form.

BUFFETT: I get some 75-year olds saying they'll think about it later. I ask him, you know, if you really think you can come to a better decision when you're 95 with a blonde sitting on your lap?

JARVIS (voice-over): The newest member to join the pledge is just 43 years old, Hamdi Ulukaya, founder of Chobani Yogurt, came to the U.S. from Turkey with just $3,000 in his pocket. Today he has an estimated worth of $1.4 billion.

HAMDI ULUKAYA, CHOBANI YOGURT: When I get to know what Bill Gates do and Warren Buffett and you know, the people who are in the philanthropy, I wanted to do it the same way that they did.

JARVIS (voice-over): His charity, Tent, will go towards helping refugees around the world.

ULUKAYA: Every three seconds a one person is displaced. You can save lives. You can make somebody's life better. Why would put it in somewhere and wait for 50 years and 70 years while you can do it like now?

JARVIS: How has it changed the shape of philanthropy and giving in this country?

BILL GATES: Well, we hope to intensify philanthropy, to get people to do it at a younger age and to be more bold, because they find people have similar causes in mind.

MELINDA GATES: I want people 20 years from now to say, philanthropy is the right thing to do.

JARVIS: For THIS WEEK, Rebecca Jarvis, ABC News, New York.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

STEPHANOPOULOS: Thanks, Rebecca, for that. And finally in THIS WEEK spotlight, my Sunday morning friend and competitor Bob Schieffer anchoring his final "Face The Nation" this morning. What a stellar career. Starting out in Vietnam for the "Fort Worth Star Telegram." In over five decades at CBS News, he's done it all. Interviewing every president since Nixon, anchoring presidential debates and the "Evening News." Even named a living legend by the Library of Congress. Congratulations, Bob, you have done it all. You've done it so well, and you'll be missed.

That's all for us today. Thanks for sharing part of your Sunday with us. Check out "World News Tonight" and I'll see you tomorrow on GMA.

Comments