'This Week' Transcript: GOP Candidate Rick Santorum and Rep. Barney Frank

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WILL: He's getting at -- and here I give my weekly disclaimer that my wife's an adviser to Mr. Perry. He's getting at the 60 percent of Republican participants in the 2008 caucuses who are evangelical Christians and who elevated Mike Huckabee.

AMANPOUR: So you think, despite your wife working for him, do you think he has a chance?

WILL: I think everyone has a chance, as long as everyone -- the majority of Iowans are still shopping.

BRAZILE: I agree with George that as long as they're still shopping and you put all these debates, these forums, these individual endorsement contests that are going on, it's still a race to see which candidate can put together the organization.

Remember, this is a cold, wintry night, and you need people who can go out and get their neighbors, their friends to come into a room and caucus.

AMANPOUR: All right, and we'll have more with our roundtable later in the program.

And coming up -- the irrepressible Barney Frank. This week, the Massachusetts Democrat announced that he's leaving Congress, but he still got plenty to say and he joins me next. Stay with us.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

FRANK: A parliamentary inquiry.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Gentleman is recognized.

FRANK: His blatant hypocrisy a violation of the rules of the House...

The gentleman from Texas, Mr. Burgess, is recognized to yield time for someone who might actually want to debate the bill.

Mr. Speaker, does whining come out of my time?

(LAUGHTER)

(END VIDEO CLIP)

AMANPOUR: Vintage Barney Frank, one of the most outspoken and distinctive members of Congress. This week, Congressman Frank announced this term, his 16th, will be his last. He's retiring after more than 30 years in the House of Representatives. And he joins me now to discuss the Washington that he will leave behind.

Thank you for joining me, Congressman. Just want to ask you, not just the Washington you're leaving behind, but the Washington that some people hope will get back to work. You have obviously been a partisan for your team. But so many people talk about you also as a skilled negotiator, as somebody who can actually legislate and get deals done. Is that going to be possible over the next, let's say, 12, 11 months until the election?

FRANK: Well, ironically, it will be for the next 12 months, in general the problem is this, and people sometimes forget, you know, if you're in England, and they have an election, whoever gets the majority in the House of Commons on Wednesday is the prime minister on Thursday.

We have a very different Constitution. People seem to forget that. Under the American Constitution, at any one time, we're governed by the people who ran in three elections, 2006, 2008 for the president, 2010. Unusually, the American people made very different decisions, the people who voted, because there was a drop-off in the electorate. The people who got elected in 2008 have very different views from those on the whole from 2010, with a broader difference.

But here's what's happening, those who were elected in 2010, who have generally not wanted the government to play a positive role in our lives, who have felt, whether it's the environment or transportation or health care, collective action is more likely to be damaging than not. I think that's terribly wrong. But there's a great conflict.

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