'This Week' Transcript: GOP Presidential Candidate Rick Santorum

But, you know, I think the -- where the taxes fall into a larger issue for Romney is the electability concern and his eroding performance on that measure, because he has looked so unsteady on his feet in the last two weeks. You know, we had this bizarre period through the fall and early winter, where the other candidates were really jostling to become the alternative to Romney and so were focusing their fire on each other, rather than him.

Starting in that Sunday before -- that debate the Sunday before New Hampshire, he has been in the crosshairs, and he has not done well. He had a very bad week in South Carolina.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And, George -- I mean, it's clear. And, George, they are banking on Florida being the backstop, big state, money can work for him there. Already 200,000 people have voted. He's been working the absentees. It's a closed primary.

But Jeb Bush -- I think the Romney campaign had been counting on Jeb Bush giving them an endorsement. He said last night he's going to stay neutral.

WILL: Yeah. Well, remember, we're going to go down the road and we're going to find, I think, Newt's not on the Virginia ballot. He may -- is he on Missouri? I can't...

WALTER: Nope.

WILL: He's not on Missouri, so he's not competitive everywhere. Here's a small sliver of a silver lining for Mitt Romney: All across the country this morning, people are waking up who running for office as Republicans, from dogcatcher to Senate, and they're saying, "Good god, Newt Gingrich might be at the top of this ticket." And that can't make them...

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: I want to stop everybody there, because we have to take a quick break, but I want to come back, and we're going to focus this question of where the Republican nomination goes next, also look ahead to the president's State of the Union. Could a third-party candidate -- the chances of that going up this time around. And finally, that Internet blackout this week that had the late-night comics buzzing.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

KIMMEL: Wikipedia was one of 7,000 websites that went black today, along with Craigslist and Reddit, and even Lolcats, Lolcats. I -- I was unable to see any cats dressed like Hitler today.

(LAUGHTER)

That's when it hit you the hardest, you know?

COLBERT: Nation, now, you may have noticed today that some of your favorite websites, like Wikipedia, Reddit, and BoingBoing, have all gone dark, which means, Internet users, the blue screen of death you were looking at this morning, that's the sky.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

(UNKNOWN): We all know about Solyndra, the White House e-mails, the FBI raids. Solyndra investors raised campaign money for Obama. The government gave Solyndra half a billion in taxpayer money. Politics as usual.

(UNKNOWN): Secretive oil billionaires attacking President Obama with ads fact-checkers say are not tethered to the facts, while independent watchdogs call this president's record on ethics "unprecedented." In America's clean-energy industry, 2.7 million jobs and expanding rapidly. President Obama kept his promise to toughen ethics rules and strengthen America's energy economy.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

STEPHANOPOULOS: In some states, the general election ads have already begun. We're going to get to that in a moment. But I'm back here right now with our roundtable, still a lot to talk about on this Republican nomination fight.

And, Amy Walter, I want to go to you. We were just talking about Florida. This has become something, I guess, of a must-win for Mitt Romney. One of the reasons it's so important, unlike all these other states, whoever wins Florida, even if it's by one vote, gets all the delegates.

WALTER: That's right, although, remember, we still are a long way from the 1,044 that we need to get to, to win this nomination. Listen, I think the Florida model traditionally has been -- well, it's a big state. You spend a lot of money. That's how you can win the state. And so Mitt Romney then goes in with an advantage.

There are absentee ballots that he's been organizing. He's been doing all the things traditional frontrunners do, except for the fact that we have two debates before those primary ballots are cast on the 31st. We have one on Monday, and we have another one on Thursday. So we go back to where we started this whole conversation, which is the role of debates in shaping these elections. So there -- you're coming off of a big win if you're Newt Gingrich, but Newt Gingrich I still think -- and this is the other -- the issue here -- there's still a lot of baggage here that Newt Gingrich has yet to deal with.

(CROSSTALK)

DOWD: And which I think -- in order for Mitt Romney to win Florida at this point, and he was ahead, I think by Tuesday -- the race will be tied in Florida by Tuesday. And if -- I did a little math last night. And people say, well, Florida's different than South Carolina. If you take the demographics and say Newt Gingrich gets exactly what he did in South Carolina, among the same demographics he wins by 6 to 8 points in Florida.

So in order -- Mitt Romney has to change the dynamics of this race.

BROWNSTEIN: But having said that, I mean, Florida is constituted more favorably to Romney than South Carolina. And the Republican Party, if you look at it nationally, as we were saying, it divides about in half now between an upscale, economically focused, more secular, pragmatic, managerial wing, the downscale, populist, evangelical wing. South Carolina clearly tilted toward the populist side. Two-thirds of the voters almost were born-again Christians. In Florida, it's only two-fifths. About 60 percent are those non-evangelicals.

And Romney did, we should note, still win them in South Carolina, non-evangelicals, despite one of the worst weeks that anybody has ever had. So there is still a foundation, but clearly it's cracking.

VANDEN HEUVEL: Now, these candidates, who are all across entitlements -- and Mitt Romney's signature issue is attacking Obama for his entitlement society -- I think forget that Social Security and Medicare are entitlements. I think they're rights. They're coming into Florida, where I suspect there are millions of Americans, including Republicans, as polls show, who don't want their entitlements taken away.

(CROSSTALK)

VANDEN HEUVEL: You know, but the debate -- could I just come back to what Amy said, though? Because we've been having a spirited debate here about the importance of debates. And I think debates have mattered in this election, which is great. They would matter a lot more if we didn't see those shadowy super PAC kind of ads, which, on the second anniversary of Citizens United, have to remember, they have been unleashed on our landscape in a way that has taken elections out of the hands of ordinary people and put them into...

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: One of the things we saw is that Newt Gingrich got hurt by the super PAC ads in Iowa, but fought back in South Carolina and his super PAC ads in South Carolina...

(CROSSTALK)

DOWD: I take an entirely different view of this issue, completely different view of this issue. I think everybody likes to say, "Wow, these super PACs, all of this money out there, and all these ads out there," they are very little effect in this race. Advertising -- television advertising in presidential politics, over the last 15 years, it's diminished in importance. And...

(CROSSTALK)

BROWNSTEIN: In the general election.

WALTER: In the general.

(CROSSTALK)

BROWNSTEIN: I think it's hard to argue it didn't matter in Iowa in the primary.

DOWD: Barack Obama outspent Hillary Clinton in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Texas 3-to-1 on television ads and lost all three.

(CROSSTALK)

VANDEN HEUVEL: This is the Ground Zero year for Citizens United.

STEPHANOPOULOS: We're now looking at this -- you know, you look at history. Every Republican who's gotten the nomination, every Democrat faces one bad week where they just get trounced. And the question is, do they come back from it? Or do they start to bleed in a way they can't control? What do you think has happened to Mitt Romney here?

WILL: I think it's better to have your bad week now than later. It's good to have a bad week, because you find out how tough you are and who you can trust among your advisers and all of that. I think there's a reason you play spring training games. This is still spring training. So I think this on balance is not -- is far from fatal, and probably will be looked back upon by Mitt Romney as a toughening experience.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Is he still the frontrunner?

BROWNSTEIN: Yes, I think he's still the frontrunner, given all of his assets. But as I said, if Gingrich can find the wherewithal to organize the coalition that is around him, that coalition is large enough to contest this for a long time, because like Obama-Clinton, you have two wings of the party that seem now -- that seem to have settled on a champion.

But, actually, real quick, to your point about Medicare, I was at a Newt Gingrich event Friday in Orangeburg, South Carolina. He was asked about Medicare and what he was going to do to strengthen it by an older woman. And older whites are also now over 63 percent Republican in 2010. And he went through an entire answer without once mentioning that he would convert the program into a premium support or voucher program...

STEPHANOPOULOS: Which is his plan.

BROWNSTEIN: Which is his plan. So they're not entirely sold that they can sell this, either.

WALTER: I just want to bring up two issues, two points about Newt and his baggage. The first is, when we asked this question in the last ABC-Washington Post poll about a week ago, 23 percent of voters said they definitely won't vote for Newt Gingrich, definitely won't vote for him. The only person who had a higher number than that was Ron Paul at 26 percent. Mitt Romney down at 8 percent. So there is a core of Republican voters who are saying this...

(CROSSTALK)

WALTER: ... percent, though, also think that his past, whether he's -- as a historian or consultant is a problem.

(CROSSTALK)

DOWD: Take that one step -- and begin to sort of say, where are you projecting forward and what are we going to see in the general election to me? And the State of the Union, I think, is the beginning of the start of the real general election campaign in this race.

To me, this Republican primary and Newt Gingrich's support is reflective of a broad anxiety going on in society, which people haven no idea what the future looks like and how to get there. And unless you present a vision of the future and how to get there, which the president has not done well and he might do, unless you present it, you're open to people saying, "We need to go backwards." And what Newt Gingrich has said -- there was a time in America that gives you comfort and gives you a sense of warmth. Let's go back. Because without a vision for the future...

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: ... let me focus the question first on these primaries, because you bring up all the points that Amy just raises. Newt Gingrich has a lot of baggage. You talk to a lot of establishment Republicans who think, flat out, he cannot be the nominee of the party, yet Mitt Romney can't seem to get the love. So does that lead to a kind of situation where, as the former Republican Party Chairman Michael Steele said just yesterday, a 50-50 chance of a brokered convention?

DOWD: Well, I think what happens -- I think that is a little bit of a fiction, because what's going to happen is, is Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney are going to pick up the vast majority of the delegates. And it's not like somebody can come into the process and say...

(CROSSTALK)

DOWD: ... and you have a bunch of delegates, and you have a bunch of delegates, you don't deserve to be president.

BROWNSTEIN: The process tends to consolidate.

VANDEN HEUVEL: Consolidate.

BROWNSTEIN: The process -- you know, and Rick Santorum -- like many previous candidates who were the third candidate in the race -- I think they're kind of like Bruce Willis in "The Sixth Sense." I mean, they're kind of dead, but they're the only one who doesn't realize it. You know, it's very hard to see...

STEPHANOPOULOS: He seemed pretty buoyant this morning.

BROWNSTEIN: You know, he does. And he will. And he can get his 15 percent or 20 percent. But it's hard to see what would allow him now to leapfrog back over Gingrich and become the dominant choice for conservatives...

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: ... Bill Kristol in the Weekly Standard saying maybe a draft for someone else. Is that out of the question?

WILL: Probably. We haven't had a second ballot at a Republican convention since, what, '52?

(CROSSTALK)

BROWNSTEIN: '52.

WILL: '52. In 1976, you had something like a convention that was on its eve at least a deliberative body...

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan.

WILL: ... not a ratifying body. But with a proliferation of primaries, it's very hard to believe someone isn't going to get 1,144 delegates and win.

WALTER: And there's -- remember, we talked a lot about momentum in this and debates and fuel the oxygen for these candidates. Once Florida's over, we go to Nevada, and then we have this big gap. We have some caucuses in between there, but we have a big gap. The month of February...

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: ... at the end of the month.

(CROSSTALK)

WALTER: ... and only one other debate scheduled, scheduled after...

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: I want to pick up on what you were saying, Matthew. You talked about the State of the Union. Let me bring this to you, Katrina. The president is going to lay out what he called a blueprint...

VANDEN HEUVEL: A blueprint.

STEPHANOPOULOS: ... for how to get jobs. It's also going to be the first blueprint of his presidential campaign.

VANDEN HEUVEL: Yes.

STEPHANOPOULOS: What do you expect to hear? What do you want to hear?

VANDEN HEUVEL: I expect to hear -- and I want to hear -- themes that he sounded in his speech at the end of last year in Kansas, where he spoke about how this is a make-or-break moment for the middle class in this country, and began to lay out a blueprint for how we build a different economy and a vision for this country that is one that is forward-looking, that is tackling not just the fundamental income inequality -- that, again, movements have brought to the fore -- but lays out a vision for a different economy, one that is not about crony capitalism, but is about a democratic capitalism that lifts all boats.

And I think Matt is right that we're looking at a debate and a campaign and an election that could be about two fundamentally different visions of this country. We have a Republican Party that wants to take this country back, literally peddling recycled policies that brought us to the financial crisis we're still living through, millions living in economic trouble and pain...

STEPHANOPOULOS: George Will?

VANDEN HEUVEL: The president needs to speak to that and lay out a vision.

WILL: When Barack Obama comes out against crony capitalism, his slogan will be, what, "No More Solyndras"? I want to hear that.

VANDEN HEUVEL: We need an industrial policy not for the energy oil companies, but for green energy, George.

(CROSSTALK)

WILL: I would expect him to do several -- several things. First, I think he'll steal a plank of Mitt Romney's campaign by attacking China as a currency manipulator. Second, he has to choose sooner or later, and he might do it Tuesday night, do taxes on millionaires and billionaires -- his favorite trope -- begin with couples earning a quarter of a million dollars, $250,000? It used to be his position; we'll see what it is.

But most of all, he's going to campaign this year on his impatience with our constitutional system. He's going to say we can't wait, we can't wait for concurrent majorities in the Senate and the House and the president and the Supreme Court. We have to somehow override the Madisonian structure of our Constitution.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And, Ron Brownstein, is that enough for him, given the fact that this is probably the most unpopular Congress in the history of America? Or does that come back and blow back on him, people blame him for making -- for not making the system work?

BROWNSTEIN: Well, I think all indications are that at the core of the speech will be kind of a follow-up to the Osawatomie, Kansas, speech, and...

(CROSSTALK)

BROWNSTEIN: And it will be kind of an economic populism that will contrast I think very sharply -- you'll have a general election in which you will have the core economic populist argument versus the core cultural populist argument that Republicans like to make, on steroids if it's Gingrich, more muted if it's Romney, but nonetheless, you know, elites in Washington trying to run your life or it's economic elites who are giving you the shaft.

And I will say to you now, I think it will give you a great, fundamental debate about the role of government, but it will not decide the election in the end, because those last 10 percent of voters who tip these things tend not to see the world in those kind of...

(CROSSTALK)

DOWD: ... Barack Obama's successes that we've seen in the course of his presidency has never been, can he give a good speech at a good moment? And it's always been, can he give a good speech at the right moment, saying a projected vision forward, and then sticking with the message consistently for a period of time so the American people gets what he's saying? What normally has done, give big speech, give a few follow-ups, and he's on to something else.

BROWNSTEIN: And he's kind of sticking with this. I mean, they are kind of sticking with the Osawatomie message.

(CROSSTALK)

VANDEN HEUVEL: You know, one thing that gets lost in all of this is that the ball and chain on our economy remains the housing crisis. And the president, I hope, will not cut a sweetheart deal with banks. One hopes in this speech -- no, seriously -- that he will lay out the need for a fair investigation of the bank fraud that contributed to this housing crisis, because without a revival of housing -- and there are 10 million more foreclosures...

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: ... write down more mortgages...

(CROSSTALK)

VANDEN HEUVEL: ... he needs to put together...

(CROSSTALK)

DOWD: The president's credibility on this is so diminished. He's got a chief of staff that worked at Citibank. He's got a budget director that worked at Bain Capital. He's taken more money from Goldman Sachs than any candidate in the history of the United States. And he's going to give his nomination speech at Bank of America Field.

(CROSSTALK)

VANDEN HEUVEL: At Bank of America...

(CROSSTALK)

VANDEN HEUVEL: That is why -- that is why we need to take money out -- that's why so many millions of people feel this government is rigged against them. That's why we need to get the money out of the system from both parties.

STEPHANOPOULOS: All those points are true, but, Amy Walter, on the other hand, he's coming into the chamber at a time, facing an unpopular Congress, when there is a fair amount of good economic news at his back, at least the beginnings of it.

WALTER: That is true. But I do think that the frustration that most Americans are feeling goes back to the point that they want to see somebody who's going to do what he says he's going to do, which is I'm -- he can't just say that he's going to transcend all of this. They want to see some actual -- something that's really coming back for them, to them. They want to see somebody who looks more like a commander-in-chief than a candidate, and that's where I think...

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: You bring up an important -- commander-in-chief. And this is something we actually haven't talked too much about yet, George Will. President Obama on the cover of Time magazine this week gives a foreign policy interview to Fareed Zakaria, says he can't wait for the debate with the Republicans, thinks their arguments are going to go away. Is this going to be much of a factor in the general election at all?

WILL: I don't think so. In the first place -- as I'm sure Matt would agree -- Americans and presidential politics (ph) really don't want to think about foreign policy unless they're forced to by bad news.

DOWD: They just want it taken care of.

(CROSSTALK)

WILL: What they want of Iraq is out of Iraq. What they want about Afghanistan is out of Afghanistan. It's pretty hard to look at what the president's doing with drones and assassinating high-value targets and call him weak on...

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: But it's not a plus for him, you're saying?

WILL: It's not a plus -- well, it's not a plus for him, but since 1968, and the riotous Democratic convention, since the nomination of McGovern in 1972, the Democratic Party has been perceived as problematic on national security. I think he is largely immunized on that.

(CROSSTALK)

VANDEN HEUVEL: I was going to say that one thing we haven't talked about with these candidates, there's very little daylight between a Gingrich, Romney, Santorum. They are all drum-beaters for a war with Iran. And I think -- Bruce Laingen, who was held in the Iranian embassy in 1979, asks, how could this country, which is trying to extricate itself from two costly, bloody misadventures in this region, now contemplate heading into another war?

WILL: There is no difference whatever between Romney's position on Iran and Leon Panetta's.

VANDEN HEUVEL: I disagree. I disagree.

(CROSSTALK)

VANDEN HEUVEL: No, you have around Romney the neocons who took us into these bloody misadventures...

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: ... Rick Santorum talking about striking Iran.

(CROSSTALK)

BROWNSTEIN: ... I want to go back to your point from a moment ago, because I think it's worth it more than in passing -- you know, while we're all so focused on the Republican race, the economic news that has come out in the last few months, if it's sustained, may be shifting the ground overall in this race a little bit. Barack Obama was not Jimmy Carter or George H.W. Bush. He never fell out of contention, never fell into the 30s for any lasting period in his approval rating. He's hanging around the number 45, 46, 47, and if he does get a little economic uplift, the terrain of November looks a lot different than we're seeing right now.

(CROSSTALK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: ... Matthew Dowd, because this is where foreign policy and economics come together. When you talk about Iran, if you continue to tighten the sanctions, oil prices go up, and you're facing $5-, $6-a-gallon gas in the summer. What does that mean?

DOWD: Well, that's the big -- that's the big problem, the question mark we have for Barack Obama. And you're right. He has gotten -- he's not dropped below, but he's not at a level he can get re-elected today. The problem is, if we look at the summer and the trajectory, he wins. If the trajectory is down, he loses. And it's all driven to a large by Europe and what's going on, on the global economy. And that's what I think the Obama folks are worried about, is they have no control over what may happen this summer.

STEPHANOPOULOS: And the question is, does he get a surprise? Fifteen seconds, George.

WILL: They do in this sense. Saudi Arabia (inaudible) seems to be ready to supplement 2 million barrels a day to keep the prices down and arguably help re-elect Mr. Obama.

STEPHANOPOULOS: That's got to be the last word. This is a fantastic roundtable. Thank you all very much.

And coming up, it was 12 years ago that George W. Bush famously accused Al Gore of practicing fuzzy math. John Berman on how some things in politics never change.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BUSH: This is a man, he's got great numbers. He talks about numbers. I'm beginning to think not only did he invent the Internet, but he invented the calculator. It's fuzzy math.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: All year long, we've seen the voters confound conventional wisdom, proving one more time that politics is a lot more art than science. But our John Berman is scratching his head over why it sometimes seems they need a math degree to keep up with the campaigns. It's in his close-up this week.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

BERMAN (voice-over): What's the single most elusive skill in politics this year? Oratory? Leadership? Charisma? Nope.

OBAMA: It's math.

BERMAN: Really, it's math. Democrats and Republicans do it.

ROMNEY: I'll do the math.

BERMAN: And if you don't do the math right, you're in trouble.

PERRY: Oops.

BERMAN: Because 2012 is the age of algebra, the campaign of calculus, the great national contest of numbers.

CAIN: 9-9-9.

BERMAN: Nine, that was a good number for Herman Cain, but 15? Problematic for Mitt Romney, especially when you're talking about a millionaire's tax rate.

ROMNEY: Closer to the 15 percent rate than anything.

BERMAN: No wonder he has the cash to make a...

ROMNEY: ... $10,000 bet.

BERMAN: How about Iowa? The Iowa caucuses might be first in the nation, but last in addition, the only state where Mitt Romney won by 8 and Rick Santorum won by 34. Hope they did better on the verbal part of the exam. They're probably saying, in the words of "Saturday Night Live"...

(UNKNOWN): It was my understanding that there would be no math.

BERMAN: There is math. There's always math. Good math, bad math, and...

BUSH: Fuzzy math.

BERMAN: And how you handle it can make or break a campaign. Just ask Rick Perry.

PERRY: It's three agencies of government when I get there that are gone. Commerce, Education, and the -- what's the third one there?

BERMAN: Yes, there is that number three, three agencies and, say, three wives, which might be considered a negative integer, but through the little-known Gingrich theorem can be turned instantly positive.

GINGRICH: I am tired of the elite media protecting Barack Obama by attacking Republicans.

BERMAN: And for the Obama campaign, none of these numbers have greater consequence than 8.5 percent, the current unemployment rate.

In the end, fuzzy or not, all these numbers -- eight votes, 34 ballots, three wives, 15 percent, 8.5 percent, $10,000 bet, or three agencies -- do add up to something: 1600, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. With the right math, one of these men will get there. Hope he brings a calculator.

That's my close-up on "This Week." John Berman, ABC News, New York.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

STEPHANOPOULOS: And John's a lot better at math than I am. I'll be back to answer some of the questions you have for us this week, but first we remember and honor our fellow Americans who serve and sacrifice.

This week, the Pentagon released the names of 11 soldiers and Marines killed in Afghanistan.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

STEPHANOPOULOS: Finally today, your voice this week, where you get to ask the questions and I take a shot at answering them.

The first one today comes from McCook's Underdog. "Do you think that Donald Trump will be a third-party presidential candidate?"

I don't. I think he may flirt with it for a little while, but there are actually some rumblings this week that he might actually endorse someone in the Republican fight, maybe even Mitt Romney. It will be interesting to see if that big South Carolina win from Newt Gingrich changes that calculation for Donald Trump. But I don't think he'll be a serious third-party candidate.

We also got a lot of questions this week about last week's interview with fake presidential candidate Stephen Colbert and his super PAC crusade.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

STEPHANOPOULOS: So you believe they are a full expression of the First Amendment?

COLBERT: Without a doubt. Do you not, George? Do you not believe that some...

STEPHANOPOULOS: I'm asking the questions today, Mr. Colbert.

COLBERT: Are you saying -- well, you answer one of my questions and I'll answer one of yours.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

STEPHANOPOULOS: Briggette Sayegh wonders, "Were you honestly a tad irked at Colbert last week or did you appreciate the humor of the interview?"

I wasn't mad at all. You know, we were both staying in character last week. He was acting like a real candidate; I was doing exactly what I would do if a candidate were there giving those kinds of answers or non-answers to the question. It was all in good fun. Of course, Colbert also out to make a serious point about those super PACs.

And finally today, "George, what was the most surprising thing that happened to you during a political interview?"

Now, that's a tough one, because, you know, so often these candidates come in so scripted, because if I had to choose one, it would be this interview I did with President Obama just before his inauguration four years ago. We were about 20 minutes into an interview that sometimes had gotten contentious, but then in my ear I found out that Malia and Sasha, who had actually come to the interview with the president, were in the control room, and they had a question for the president. They wanted to know when they were going to get a dog. And that's where the president broke some news just a couple of days before the inauguration.

If you've got a question, send it in on Facebook, Twitter at hashtag #askgeorge or anytime on abcnews.com and Yahoo.

That's all for us today. "World News" with David Muir has the latest headlines tonight. Tuesday, Diane Sawyer and I will anchor live coverage off the president's State of the Union and the Republican response at 9:00 Eastern, 6:00 Pacific, and check out otusnews.com all week long for the latest from our political team.

Thanks for sharing part of your Sunday with us. I'll see you tomorrow on "GMA."

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