MIT

Zimmerman said he is aware of the studies cited by MIT that concluded the reactor core could survive a close-range truck bomb. Nonetheless, he considered ABC News' investigation valuable. "It's something that I think is worthy of follow-up," Zimmerman said, "If the security plans are not being met, or in hindsight, there is an additional measure that should be in place that's not currently there, we want to be able to look at that."

Veteran security consultant Ronald E. Timm has analyzed the vulnerability of the nation's nuclear laboratories for the Department of Energy. He said that the presence of two armed guards at MIT is "a very good start for where you want to go."

But Timm was critical of other elements of MIT's security.

Timm said that in just 60 seconds a terrorist could cut a hole big enough for a truck loaded with explosives to drive through. As for the detailed information still available on the Internet, despite MIT's claim that it was removed after 9/11, Timm said the floor plans and diagrams would be a big help to a potential terrorist planning an attack: "This is what the bad guy is looking for."

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