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  • Olympians With Health Problems

    In September 2011, Venus Williams (right) was diagnosed with Sjogren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease, just six months after her younger sister Serena Williams was rushed to a Los Angeles hospital for complications from a blood clot in her lung. Now the tennis star siblings, 32 and 30, are back in the game, landing a spot in the pairs semi-finals Friday. Serena made the semis for singles, too.
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  • Olympians With Health Problems

    Rebecca Soni won gold for her 200-meter breaststroke performance Aug. 2, besting her own world record at the age of 25. In 2006, Soni had surgery to treat an abnormal heart rhythm that would race as fast as 400 beats per minute. Now her heartbeat is normal.
    Matt Slocum/AP Photo
  • Olympians With Health Problems

    Dana Vollmer won gold July 29 for her record-breaking 100-meter butterfly race despite having a genetic heart condition called long QT syndrome. Because the condition can cause sudden cardiac arrest, the 24-year-old swimmer reportedly competes with a defibrillator nearby.
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  • Olympians With Health Problems

    In June 2012, beach volleyball star Phil Dalhausser was treated for blood clots in his shoulder and arm. He was reportedly hospitalized for three days and took blood thinners for a month. With partner Todd Rogers, the defending Olympic champions hit the playoffs Friday.
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  • Olympians With Health Problems

    Beach volleyball player Jake Gibb is a two-time Olympian and two-time cancer survivor, beating both skin cancer and testicular cancer. Gibb, 36, discovered his testicular cancer after a doping test in 2010 revealed high levels of the hormone beta-hCG, a marker for testicular cancer that's also injected by steroid users to prevent testicular shrinkage.
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  • Olympians With Health Problems

    Swimmer Eric Shanteau was diagnosed with testicular cancer a week before the Beijing Olympic trials. He opted to postpone treatment until after the games, and then founded Swim For Your Life to benefit programs and services of the Lance Armstrong Foundation. Shanteau, now 28 and reportedly cancer-free, will compete in the men's 4x100-meter medley relay Aug. 3.
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  • Olympians With Health Problems

    Carrie Johnson was diagnosed with Crohn's disease, an inflammatory bowel condition, while training for the 2004 Olympics. But tweaks to her diet and training regimen allowed the 28-year-old to compete at the Athens, Beijing and London Games. Johnson hits the water for the 200-meter canoe sprint Friday.
    Harry How/Getty Images for USOC
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