Padres draft Johnny Manziel 837th

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NEW YORK -- Just call him Johnny Baseball.

Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel was selected by the San Diego Padres in the 28th round of the Major League Baseball draft Saturday -- the 837th player taken.

Manziel was listed as a shortstop for Texas A&M, although he never played for the Aggies as he focused on football.

Manziel, who became the first freshman to win the Heisman Trophy in 2012, was taken by the Browns with the 22nd overall pick in the NFL draft last month.

The quarterback took to Twitter on Saturday afternoon to express his excitement:

Mike Dee, the Padres' president and CEO, tweeted back:

"It was kind of, 'Why not,'" Padres general manager Josh Byrnes said Saturday before the Padres hosted the Washington Nationals.

In May 2013, Manziel visited the Padres when he was in San Diego to work with a quarterbacks coach.

"He certainly loves baseball," Byrnes said. "We kind of talked about it at that time, 'Do you want us to draft you?' He said, 'Yeah, absolutely.'"

Why in the 28th round?

"We really liked our 27th-rounder," Byrnes said.

Asked the odds of signing Manziel, Byrnes, a big football fan, just smiled.

It is unlikely Manziel will ever play, as no 837th pick in the June draft has ever played in an MLB game, according to ESPN Stats & Information.

Manziel played baseball and football at Tivy High School in Kerrville, Texas, and asked Texas A&M coaches about being part of the baseball team before winning the Aggies' starting quarterback job as a redshirt freshman.

Earlier this week, Manziel -- decked out in an Indians jersey -- was set to throw out the first pitch in Cleveland before the Indians played Boston. His toss was washed out by rain that delayed the start.

In May 2013, Manziel took batting practice with the Padres at Petco Park and tossed out a football-style first pitch, as he dropped back, scrambled to the side of the mound and floated a bootleg "pass" to San Diego outfielder Mark Kotsay, who caught it behind his back with his glove.

On Manziel's first swing in batting practice, the bat flew out of his hands, but he settled down and later drove a pitch off the right-field wall.

"I didn't know he played baseball," Padres right-hander  Ian Kennedy said Saturday. "Anybody in Texas probably plays all those sports, football, baseball."

Padres closer  Huston Street, who pitched at Texas and whose late father, James, played quarterback for the Longhorns, liked the pick, even if Manziel did play for the Aggies.

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