Save Time, Money with Cellular Secrets

cell

We count on our mobile phones to stay connected with friends and family. But their cost in both time and money can be high. So, try these secrets to save a lot of both.

1. Send Texts Via E-mail

Does your phone not support multimedia messaging? Or are you nearing your monthly text-messaging limit? Then send your photo or text message via e-mail.

Just open a new e-mail message. In the To: field, enter the 10-digit telephone number (without dashes). Then enter the appropriate domain name for the recipient's carrier.

AT&T: @txt.att.net

Sprint: @messaging.sprintpcs.com

T-Mobile: @tmomail.net

Verizon: @vtext.com

Standard charges apply for the recipient. If you're e-mailing from a cellphone, you'll pay for data usage.

2. Block Messages

Maybe you don't like text messaging. So why pay to receive unwanted texts? Block texts or set up filters.

AT&T users must register for Message Preferences at mymessages.wireless.att.com. Sign in and you're given options to block specific types of messages. You can also allow and block messages from specific numbers.

Sprint lets you block messages from specific numbers. Log in to your account online. Click My Sprint, then My Online Tools. Under Communication Tools, select Block Text Messages.

Some plans may not provide this option. Or, you may want to block all billable messages. In that case, call *2 for customer service.

T-Mobile lets you block messages based on type. Log in to your account online and click My Account, then Change services. Select the blocking features you would like. Click Change Services.

For Verizon, log in to your online account. Select Preferences and choose Text Blocking. Block specific addresses or types of messages.

3. Skip the Formalities

Tired of listening to your friend's obnoxious voice mail greeting? Then skip it. When the greeting starts, enter the appropriate code for the recipient's carrier.

AT&T: #

Sprint: 1

T-Mobile: #

Verizon: *

Shortcuts to Stay On Top of Your Account

4. Check Your Account

Have you used up your monthly minutes? And how many text messages do you have left? A quick call will tell you. Just use these shortcuts.

AT&T

*MIN# (*646#) for minutes used

*DATA# (*3282#) for text usage

*BAL# (*225#) for account balance

*PAY (*729) to make a payment

Sprint

*4 for billing information

*3 to make a payment

T-Mobile

#MIN# (#646#) for minutes used

#MSG# (#674#) for text usage

#BAL# (#225#) for account balance

Verizon

#MIN (#646) for minutes used

#DATA (#3282) for text usage

#BAL (#225) for account balance

#PMT (#768) to make a payment

5. Navigate Your Voice Mail

Checking your voice mail can be a chore. But, shortcuts can help you out when you're listening to a message. Speed it up, slow it down, save it and more.

AT&T

1: Rewind

2: Pause

3: Fast forward

4: Slower

5: Message date and time

6: Faster

7: Delete

9: Save

0: Help

(#): Skip

(*): Exit

Sprint

1: Message date and time

2: Reply

3: Fast forward

4: Replay

5: Rewind

6: Forward message

7: Delete

8: Call back

9: Save

0: Help

(#): Skip

(*): Cancel

Verizon

1: Rewind

11: Replay

2: Pause

3: Fast Forward

33: End of message

4: Slow

5: Message date and time

6: Speed

7: Delete

9: Save

0: Help

(*): Exit

(#): Skip

T-Mobile

1: Rewind

11: Replay

2: Pause

3: Fast forward

33: End

44: Slower

66: Faster

7: Delete

9: Save

(#): Skip

6. Text a Landline

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