Strange New World: Picks of the Week

This week, as clouds on the economic horizon continue to grow, innovation is finding a home in the auto industry. It looks as though General Motors is finally stepping out of its whack-the-new-idea past and moving toward a "green" future.

Also, the FBI just released a report on Internet crime. Maybe the Web is not quite as dangerous as you think. The real world may be of more concern. And finally, before you book you air travel this summer with sites like Orbitz and Expedia, why not check out this year's crop of new travel services?

Here are our picks for the top tech stories of the week:

1) GM "Volts" ahead. From a strictly technological perspective, terms like "Advanced Automotive Technology" and "New Car" are stone cold oxymorons. Compared to things that really do change, like computers and the Web, cars today are essentially the same internally combusted, rubber-tire rolling, innovation-free idiot boxes they were 10, 20, 30 — heck, even 130 years ago. Yet, change may finally be coming.

GM, of all companies, had a press tour this week for its new all-electric car, Volt. And we have to say, we were impressed. First of all, there is no "American Revolution" marketing drivel here. Instead, GM is letting the story of creating a new car — dare we say the truth — be the message. There is a decent Web site about the Volt where — shock of shocks — there are facts, pictures and honest discussions about the problems the company is facing in developing the car. And sit down for this: There's even a section for customer input!

For our money, not only does GM deserve credit for a legitimate attempt to develop a truly new car, but the company is showing it may be maturing from the "pay no attention to reality" mentality that has crippled innovation in cars for decades. GM still might find a way to pull defeat from the jaws of innovation victory here. But as of now, we are loving the notion of not only being intrigued by a car company, but by an American car company.

Way to go, GM.

2) The not-so-dangerous Web.

The FBI released its latest Internet crime report this week, and it says cyber fraud cost Americans nearly $240 million in 2007. We whipped out our calculators and did some tinkering and realized that the report actually just might show how safe the Web is, not how dangerous.

Why? Just compare Web fraud figures with total fraud figures — the number of people getting ripped off here in the real world. The Web turns out to not really be that much scarier a place. Total complaints about Web fraud actually dropped by roughly three-tenths of a percent, between January 2006 and January 2007. Compare that with total complaints for all consumer fraud for basically the same period. We used data from the Federal Trade Commission. That agency said it received almost 140,000 more complaints in 2007 than it did in 2006.

So while the amount of Web fraud remained essentially flat, instances of overall fraud were up.

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: Firefighters rescue a woman who got stuck in a chimney in Thousand Oaks, Calif.
Ventura County Fire Department
PHOTO: Apple Pay is demonstrated at Apple headquarters on Oct. 16, 2014 in Cupertino, Calif.
Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP Photo
PHOTO: Up in Ash: Mount Sinabung Erupting
Tibt Nangin/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
PHOTO: Defendant Jodi Arias testifies about killing Travis Alexander in 2008 during her murder trial in Phoenix, Feb. 20, 2013.
Charlie Leight/The Arizona Republic/AP Photo
PHOTO: Kim Kardashian, Kanye West, their daughter North West and Delphine Arnault attend the Givenchy show as part of the Paris Fashion Week Womenswear Spring/Summer 2015, Sept. 28, 2014 in Paris.
Bertrand Rindoff Petroff/French Select/Getty Images