Lunar Eclipse's Astrological Impact Will Be Felt Even If Eclipse Not Visible

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If emotions are running high and it feels as it it's a time of beginnings and endings, rest assured you can place some of the blame on Wednesday's lunar eclipse.

"The time before a lunar eclipse is usually really frenzied," said Diana Brownstone, a New York City astrologer. "Speaking and listening are so crucial during this time to prevent communication blowouts with people."

On the night of June 15, the moon will pass behind Earth, blocking the sun's rays from hitting the moon.

The spectacle, the first of two lunar eclipses set for this year, won't be visible from much of the Northern Hemisphere, but Lawrence Grecco, another New York astrologer, said that doesn't mean people in the United States are exempt from the astrological ramifications.

Much like the orange light that will glow inside the full moon for 100 minutes, Grecco said a kind of light also tends to go off inside people.

"A light goes on in our heads and hearts, and we realize something we didn't before," he said.

Since eclipses repeat themselves every 19 years, "people can look back on this time period of their lives in 1992 and early 1993 and remember what internal changes were going on and what they were feeling," Grecco said.

Eclipses can have an impact on countries too. Brownstone said full moons tend to bring relationships to a climax, and this eclipse in particular will influence the perception of the United States and our foreign relations.

"It all comes out during this time," she said. "It's a lot of tension but also does come down to the free will of our leaders."

The next lunar eclipse will take place Dec. 10 and will be visible from the East Coast of the United States.

As for what the United States can expect then, well, it's a little cryptic: "Past actions will affect how alliances play out," said Brownstone.

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