Spaceweather.com
  • Northern Lights Seen Across U.S.

    Red and pink streaks filled the sky across parts of the country after Earth?s magnetic field was hit by a coronal mass ejection, enabling the Northern Lights to be seen across the southeastern part of the United States.
    Spaceweather.com
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    Red and pink streaks filled the sky across parts of the country after Earth's magnetic field was hit by a coronal mass ejection, which enabled the Northern Lights to be seen across the southeastern part of the United States. [<a href="http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2011/10/northern-lights-seen-across-southeast-u-s/">READ MORE</a>]
    Soloman Parker/ABC News
  • Northern Lights Fill the Sky

    A passenger flying from San Francisco to Paris named Nate Bolt took some amazing time lapse photos of what turned out to be an aurora borealis light display in the night sky. Bolt turned his shots into a video, which have gone viral online. Here, the aurora borealis is picutred at 30,000 feet.
    Courtesy Nate Bolt
  • Solar Flare Creates Stunning Light Show

    A series of solar wind streams buffeted Earth's magnetic field in mid-February 2011, producing bright auroras shown here around the Arctic Circle.
    Helge Mortensen/SpaceWeather.com
  • Solar Flare Creates Stunning Light Show

    At the Vasatokka Nature Resort and Youth Holiday Center in Inari, Northern Lapland, Finland, Feb. 21, 2011, people said the aurora lit up the sky for an hour.
    Andy Keen/SpaceWeather.com
  • Solar Flare Creates Stunning Light Show

    The aurora was seen from Abisko National Park in Sweden, Feb. 21, 2011.
    Chad Blakley/SpaceWeather.com
  • Solar Flare Creates Stunning Light Show

    Northern lights over Reykjavik, Iceland. A giant solar flare, known as a coronal mass ejection, buffeted Earth's magnetic field on Feb. 18, 2011, creating conditions favorable to polar auroras. The display continued off and on for more than 48 hours.
    Marketa Stanczykova/SpaceWeather.com
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    Thanks to the biggest solar flare in four years, millions of skywatchers should be able to see the aurora borealis (or northern lights) this week. This photo provided by NASA shows a large flare (lower center of the sun's disc) seen by the Solar Dynamics Observatory in extreme ultraviolet light Feb. 15, 2011. It was the largest solar flare since December 5, 2006.
    NASA
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    This image of a nighttime light show on Feb. 14, 2011 was submitted to SpaceWeather.com by a photographer in Lofoten Island, Norway.
    Geir Nøtnes/Spaceweather.com
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    "Even with the bright moon up this fast changing, bright and colorful aurora was enough to shine through," said Conor McDonald, who shot this image Feb. 15, 2011 in Maghera, Northern Ireland. The aurora peaked about 35 degrees high and was well over 60 degrees long."
    Conor McDonald/Spaceweather.com
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    This photo was shot and sent to SpaceWeather.com by Helge Mortensen near Tomoso, Norway on Feb. 16, 2011. "I haven't seen the aurora for several weeks now due to bad weather," she wrote. "Amazing how the moon is able to light up the landscape."
    Helge Mortensen/Spaceweather.com
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    "The aurora comes so bright that the snow looks a little green," wrote Carlos Vazquez, who shot this ten-second exposure Feb. 11, 2011 in Melkefoss, Norway.
    Carlos Vazquez/Spaceweather.com
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    Fredrik Broms, who took this picture from Kvaløya, Norway, Feb. 15, 2011, said, "The aurora-show continues with amazing curling bands stretching like a giant green snake over the moonlit landscape."
    Fredrik Broms/Spaceweather.com
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    If you live in the northernmost U.S. or Europe, you may have seen a spectacular light show in the skies Tuesday night. Thanks to a giant solar flare on Aug. 1, the Aurora Borealis (or Northern Lights) could be seen by people from Wisconsin to Maine and up into Canada. NOAA's Space Weather center says more may be visible tonight. This photo was taken by Bob Johnson Tuesday night in the Canadian city of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
    Bob Johnson
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    Usually only people who live close to the Arctic can see the Aurora Borealis, but solar storms can spread them south. This photo from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in Canada also shows a meteor.
    Bob Johnson
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    Another photo taken Tuesday night in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The camera was mounted on a tripod, and the shutter was opened for periods ranging from 10 seconds to five minutes.
    Bob Johnson
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    Photographer <a href="http://www.travisnovitsky.com/" target="external">Travis Novitsky</a> took this photograph Tuesday night in Grand Portage, Minn. between 11 pm and 12 am CDT.
    Travis Novitsky
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    Travis Novitsky, who took this photograph from Grand Portage, Minn., said it seemed as though most people in Minnesota had cloudy skies Tuesday night, but clouds didn't move into his area until after the aurora had faded.
    Travis Novitsky
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    Travis Novitsky also shot this photograph from Grand Portage, Minn. Tuesday night.
    Travis Novitsky
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    Olivier Du Tre took this photograph Tuesday night in Cochrane, Alberta in Canada. He said he's been dreaming of seeing the Aurora Borealis since he was a little boy.
    Olivier Du Tre
  • Northern Lights: Sun Storm Gives Spectacular Show

    This photograph from Chippewa Falls, Wisc. was taken by Tony Wilder.
    Tony Wilder
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